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Article: Obesity, physical activity, and mortality in a prospective Chinese elderly cohort

TitleObesity, physical activity, and mortality in a prospective Chinese elderly cohort
Authors
KeywordsReferences (39) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archinternmed.com
Citation
Archives Of Internal Medicine, 2006, v. 166 n. 14, p. 1498-1504 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In older people, it is unclear whether obesity relates to mortality, which calls into question its etiologic role in disease and its public health relevance. This apparent lack of relationship in older people could be an artifactual result of their diverse health states. Methods: We used Cox regression analysis to determine whether the effect of body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) or physical activity on mortality varied with health status in a prospective cohort study of Chinese people 65 years or older enrolled from 1998 to 2000 at all of the 18 Elderly Health Centers of the Hong Kong Government Department of Health. Health status was categorized into 5 morbidity groups using a 12-item index covering illnesses, medications, frailty, and smoking. Results: After a mean follow-up of 4.1 years, there were 3819 deaths in 54 088 subjects (96.5% successful follow-up). The effect of BMI on mortality varied with baseline health status (P<.001). In the healthiest group, obese people (BMI ≥25) had higher mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-2.33), but in the unhealthiest group they had lower mortality (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.49-0.63) compared with subjects of normal weight. Daily physical activity was associated with lower mortality compared with inactivity in the unhealthiest group (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.61- 0.81) but not in the healthiest group. Conclusions: In the elderly, the relationship between obesity and mortality varies according to the underlying health status. In those with poor health status, obesity is associated with better outcome, whereas in those with initially good health status, obesity is associated with worse outcome. ©2006 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92555
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 17.333
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTai, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSai, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWai, MCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKin, SHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMay, KTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:49:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:49:57Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Internal Medicine, 2006, v. 166 n. 14, p. 1498-1504en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-9926en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92555-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In older people, it is unclear whether obesity relates to mortality, which calls into question its etiologic role in disease and its public health relevance. This apparent lack of relationship in older people could be an artifactual result of their diverse health states. Methods: We used Cox regression analysis to determine whether the effect of body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) or physical activity on mortality varied with health status in a prospective cohort study of Chinese people 65 years or older enrolled from 1998 to 2000 at all of the 18 Elderly Health Centers of the Hong Kong Government Department of Health. Health status was categorized into 5 morbidity groups using a 12-item index covering illnesses, medications, frailty, and smoking. Results: After a mean follow-up of 4.1 years, there were 3819 deaths in 54 088 subjects (96.5% successful follow-up). The effect of BMI on mortality varied with baseline health status (P<.001). In the healthiest group, obese people (BMI ≥25) had higher mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-2.33), but in the unhealthiest group they had lower mortality (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.49-0.63) compared with subjects of normal weight. Daily physical activity was associated with lower mortality compared with inactivity in the unhealthiest group (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.61- 0.81) but not in the healthiest group. Conclusions: In the elderly, the relationship between obesity and mortality varies according to the underlying health status. In those with poor health status, obesity is associated with better outcome, whereas in those with initially good health status, obesity is associated with worse outcome. ©2006 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archinternmed.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Internal Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (39) View In Table Layouten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshAging - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate - trendsen_HK
dc.titleObesity, physical activity, and mortality in a prospective Chinese elderly cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSai, YH:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySai, YH=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archinte.166.14.1498en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16864760-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746457411en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746457411&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume166en_HK
dc.identifier.issue14en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1498en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1504en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1538-3679-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239211200010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTai, HL=7201668640en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSai, YH=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWai, MC=8571203300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKin, SH=14050194100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMay, KT=14050755700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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