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Article: Provision of ancillary medications during buprenorphine detoxification does not improve treatment outcomes

TitleProvision of ancillary medications during buprenorphine detoxification does not improve treatment outcomes
Authors
KeywordsAncillary medications
Buprenorphine
Opioid dependence
Treatment
Withdrawal
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe Haworth Medical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/JAD
Citation
Journal Of Addictive Diseases, 2010, v. 29 n. 1, p. 23-29 How to Cite?
AbstractFor individuals dependent on opioids, recovery efforts begin with a period of withdrawal that typically includes discomfort from symptoms, possibly precipitating a return to drug use. The study described here investigated whether the provision of ancillary medications for opioid withdrawal symptoms affected treatment outcomes in 139 participants receiving buprenorphine in a 13-day detoxification trial. Outcome measures include the number of opioid-free urine samples collected and retention in treatment. Ancillary medications were provided to 70% of participants: 59% received medication for insomnia, 45% for anxiety, 40% for bone pain, 35% for nausea, and 28% for diarrhea. Findings indicate no difference in the number of opioid-free urine samples between the group receiving ancillary medication and the group who did not, although tests of specific ancillary medications indicate that those who received diarrhea medication had fewer opioid-free urines than those who did not (P =.004). Results also indicate that participants attended fewer days of treatment if they received anxiety, nausea, or diarrhea medication compared to no medication (all P values <.05). Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92552
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.781
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.855
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHillhouse, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorDomier, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChim, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorLing, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:49:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:49:52Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Addictive Diseases, 2010, v. 29 n. 1, p. 23-29en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1055-0887en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92552-
dc.description.abstractFor individuals dependent on opioids, recovery efforts begin with a period of withdrawal that typically includes discomfort from symptoms, possibly precipitating a return to drug use. The study described here investigated whether the provision of ancillary medications for opioid withdrawal symptoms affected treatment outcomes in 139 participants receiving buprenorphine in a 13-day detoxification trial. Outcome measures include the number of opioid-free urine samples collected and retention in treatment. Ancillary medications were provided to 70% of participants: 59% received medication for insomnia, 45% for anxiety, 40% for bone pain, 35% for nausea, and 28% for diarrhea. Findings indicate no difference in the number of opioid-free urine samples between the group receiving ancillary medication and the group who did not, although tests of specific ancillary medications indicate that those who received diarrhea medication had fewer opioid-free urines than those who did not (P =.004). Results also indicate that participants attended fewer days of treatment if they received anxiety, nausea, or diarrhea medication compared to no medication (all P values <.05). Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Haworth Medical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/JADen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Addictive Diseasesen_HK
dc.subjectAncillary medicationsen_HK
dc.subjectBuprenorphineen_HK
dc.subjectOpioid dependenceen_HK
dc.subjectTreatmenten_HK
dc.subjectWithdrawalen_HK
dc.titleProvision of ancillary medications during buprenorphine detoxification does not improve treatment outcomesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChim, D: dchim@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChim, D=rp01324en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10550880903438925en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20390696-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2856108-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951240618en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951240618&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage23en_HK
dc.identifier.epage29en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1545-0848-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274795600003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHillhouse, M=6602234536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDomier, CP=7006554259en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChim, D=8126693800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLing, W=7102496096en_HK

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