File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Growth environment and sex differences in lipids, body shape and diabetes risk

TitleGrowth environment and sex differences in lipids, body shape and diabetes risk
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2007, v. 2 n. 10 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Sex differences in lipids and body shape, but not diabetes, increase at puberty. Hong Kong Chinese are mainly first generation migrants from China, who have shared an economically developed environment for years, but grew up in very different environments in Hong Kong or contemporaneously undeveloped Guangdong, China. We assessed if environment during growth had sex-specific associations with lipids and body shape, but not diabetes. Methodology and Principal Findings. We used multivariable regression in a population-based cross-sectional study, undertaken from 1994 to 1996, of 2537 Hong Kong Chinese residents aged 25 to 74 years with clinical measurements of ischaemic heart disease [IHD] risk including HDL-cholesterol, ApoB, diabetes and obesity. Waist-hip ratio was higher (mean difference 0.01, 95% Cl O.001 to 0.02) in men, who had grown up in an economically developed rather than undeveloped environment, as was apolipoprotein B (0.05 g/L 95% Cl 0.001 to 0.10), adjusted for age, socio-economic status and lifestyle. In contrast, the same comparison was associated in women with lower waist-hip ratio (-0.01, 95% Cl -0.001 to -0.02) and higher HDL-cholesterol (0.05 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.0004 to 0.10). The associations in men and women were significantly different (p-values<0.001). There-were no such differences for diabetes. Conclusion. Growth in a developed environment with improved nutrition may promote higher sex-steroids at puberty producing an atherogenic lipid profile and male fat pattern in men but the opposite in women, with tracking of increased male IHD risk into adult life. Copyright: © 2007 Schooling et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92545
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee (HSRC)411026
University of Hong Kong Committee on Research and Conference
Hong Kong Research Grants Council407/94m
Hong Kong Society for the Aged
Funding Information:

The study was supported by the Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee (HSRC# 411026), the University of Hong Kong Committee on Research and Conference Grants, the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (grant 407/94m) and the Hong Kong Society for the Aged. The funding source had no involvement in the design, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the paper for publication.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:49:38Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:49:38Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2007, v. 2 n. 10en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92545-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Sex differences in lipids and body shape, but not diabetes, increase at puberty. Hong Kong Chinese are mainly first generation migrants from China, who have shared an economically developed environment for years, but grew up in very different environments in Hong Kong or contemporaneously undeveloped Guangdong, China. We assessed if environment during growth had sex-specific associations with lipids and body shape, but not diabetes. Methodology and Principal Findings. We used multivariable regression in a population-based cross-sectional study, undertaken from 1994 to 1996, of 2537 Hong Kong Chinese residents aged 25 to 74 years with clinical measurements of ischaemic heart disease [IHD] risk including HDL-cholesterol, ApoB, diabetes and obesity. Waist-hip ratio was higher (mean difference 0.01, 95% Cl O.001 to 0.02) in men, who had grown up in an economically developed rather than undeveloped environment, as was apolipoprotein B (0.05 g/L 95% Cl 0.001 to 0.10), adjusted for age, socio-economic status and lifestyle. In contrast, the same comparison was associated in women with lower waist-hip ratio (-0.01, 95% Cl -0.001 to -0.02) and higher HDL-cholesterol (0.05 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.0004 to 0.10). The associations in men and women were significantly different (p-values<0.001). There-were no such differences for diabetes. Conclusion. Growth in a developed environment with improved nutrition may promote higher sex-steroids at puberty producing an atherogenic lipid profile and male fat pattern in men but the opposite in women, with tracking of increased male IHD risk into adult life. Copyright: © 2007 Schooling et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subject.meshAtherosclerosis-
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - ethnology - etiology-
dc.subject.meshLipids - chemistry-
dc.subject.meshRisk-
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristics-
dc.titleGrowth environment and sex differences in lipids, body shape and diabetes risken_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0001070en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17957253-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2031823-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-42449147511en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros139044-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-42449147511&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000207458500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3509710-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats