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Article: Incidence, natural history, and risk factors for biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy

TitleIncidence, natural history, and risk factors for biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hepatology.org/
Citation
Hepatology, 2005, v. 41 n. 2, p. 359-365 How to Cite?
AbstractGallstones are strongly associated with higher parity in women. This study prospectively assessed the incidence, natural history, and risk factors for biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy and the postpartum in 3,254 women at an army medical center. Women with a prior cholecystectomy or with stones at their first study ultrasound were excluded. Gallbladder ultrasound and subject questionnaires were obtained in each trimester and at 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. Serum glucose, lipids, insulin, leptin, estradiol, and progesterone were measured at 26 to 28 weeks' gestation. A nested case-control study was done to examine the effects of serum leptin and insulin on incident gallbladder disease. At least two study ultrasounds were available for 3,254 women. Sludge or stones had been found on at least one study ultrasound in 5.1% by the second trimester, 7.9% by the third trimester, and 10.2% by 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. Regression of sludge and stones was common, such that overall 4.2% had new sludge or stones on the postpartum ultrasound. Twenty-eight women (0.8%) underwent cholecystectomy within the first year postpartum. Prepregnancy body mass index was a strong predictor of incident gallbladder disease (P < .001). Serum leptin was independently associated with gallbladder disease (odds ratio per 1 ng/dL increase, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.11), even after adjusting for body mass index. In conclusion, incident gallbladder sludge and stones are common in pregnancy and the postpartum, and cholecystectomy is frequently done within the first year postpartum. Prepregnancy obesity and serum leptin are strong risk factors for pregnancy-associated gallbladder disease.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92524
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.711
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.752
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBeresford, SAAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchulte, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMatsumoto, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:48:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:48:51Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHepatology, 2005, v. 41 n. 2, p. 359-365en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0270-9139en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92524-
dc.description.abstractGallstones are strongly associated with higher parity in women. This study prospectively assessed the incidence, natural history, and risk factors for biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy and the postpartum in 3,254 women at an army medical center. Women with a prior cholecystectomy or with stones at their first study ultrasound were excluded. Gallbladder ultrasound and subject questionnaires were obtained in each trimester and at 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. Serum glucose, lipids, insulin, leptin, estradiol, and progesterone were measured at 26 to 28 weeks' gestation. A nested case-control study was done to examine the effects of serum leptin and insulin on incident gallbladder disease. At least two study ultrasounds were available for 3,254 women. Sludge or stones had been found on at least one study ultrasound in 5.1% by the second trimester, 7.9% by the third trimester, and 10.2% by 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. Regression of sludge and stones was common, such that overall 4.2% had new sludge or stones on the postpartum ultrasound. Twenty-eight women (0.8%) underwent cholecystectomy within the first year postpartum. Prepregnancy body mass index was a strong predictor of incident gallbladder disease (P < .001). Serum leptin was independently associated with gallbladder disease (odds ratio per 1 ng/dL increase, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.11), even after adjusting for body mass index. In conclusion, incident gallbladder sludge and stones are common in pregnancy and the postpartum, and cholecystectomy is frequently done within the first year postpartum. Prepregnancy obesity and serum leptin are strong risk factors for pregnancy-associated gallbladder disease.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hepatology.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHepatologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.titleIncidence, natural history, and risk factors for biliary sludge and stones during pregnancyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hep.20534en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15660385-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-12844282181en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-12844282181&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume41en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage359en_HK
dc.identifier.epage365en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226637900018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, CW=7202596492en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeresford, SAA=7006403537en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchulte, SJ=7006502482en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMatsumoto, AM=7403108057en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK

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