File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Model bile and bile salts accelerate mucin secretion by cultured dog gallbladder epithelial cells

TitleModel bile and bile salts accelerate mucin secretion by cultured dog gallbladder epithelial cells
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date1995
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 1995, v. 109 n. 1, p. 264-274 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Aims: Hypersecretion of gallbladder mucin has been proposed as a pathogenic factor in gallstone formation. We investigated whether mucin secretion is modulated by biliary constituents using normal, well- differentiated dog gallbladder epithelial cells. Methods: Model biles or bile salts were applied to monolayers of epithelial cells. Mucin secretion was studied by measuring the secretion of [3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins. Results: Model biles with different cholesterol saturation indices increased mucin secretion by the cells to an average 251% after 5 hours of incubation (P < 0.01). Mucin secretion remained elevated during a 24-hour period, suggesting a sustained effect on mucin secretion. There was no relation between the cholesterol or phospholipid concentration and the extent of stimulation of mucin secretion. Taurocholate caused a dose- dependent increase in mucin secretion, suggesting that bile salt was the bile component responsible for the stimulatory effect. At a concentration of 0.5 mmol/L, only the more hydrophobic bile salts taurochenodeoxycholate and taurodeoxycholate, but not the hydrophylic bile salts taurocholate and tauroursodeoxycholate, stimulated mucin secretion (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Bile salts play an important role in the regulation of mucin secretion. A shift in the bile salt composition of bile towards the more hydrophobic bile salts may cause mucin hypersecretion, thereby initiating cholesterol gallstone formation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92523
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKlinkspoor, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKuver, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorSavard, CEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOda, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorAzzouz, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTytgat, GNJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGroen, AKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:48:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:48:49Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 1995, v. 109 n. 1, p. 264-274en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92523-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Aims: Hypersecretion of gallbladder mucin has been proposed as a pathogenic factor in gallstone formation. We investigated whether mucin secretion is modulated by biliary constituents using normal, well- differentiated dog gallbladder epithelial cells. Methods: Model biles or bile salts were applied to monolayers of epithelial cells. Mucin secretion was studied by measuring the secretion of [3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins. Results: Model biles with different cholesterol saturation indices increased mucin secretion by the cells to an average 251% after 5 hours of incubation (P < 0.01). Mucin secretion remained elevated during a 24-hour period, suggesting a sustained effect on mucin secretion. There was no relation between the cholesterol or phospholipid concentration and the extent of stimulation of mucin secretion. Taurocholate caused a dose- dependent increase in mucin secretion, suggesting that bile salt was the bile component responsible for the stimulatory effect. At a concentration of 0.5 mmol/L, only the more hydrophobic bile salts taurochenodeoxycholate and taurodeoxycholate, but not the hydrophylic bile salts taurocholate and tauroursodeoxycholate, stimulated mucin secretion (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Bile salts play an important role in the regulation of mucin secretion. A shift in the bile salt composition of bile towards the more hydrophobic bile salts may cause mucin hypersecretion, thereby initiating cholesterol gallstone formation.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.titleModel bile and bile salts accelerate mucin secretion by cultured dog gallbladder epithelial cellsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0016-5085(95)90293-7en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid7797024-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029045463en_HK
dc.identifier.volume109en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage264en_HK
dc.identifier.epage274en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RG19100031-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlinkspoor, JH=6602590656en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKuver, R=6701723533en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSavard, CE=6701738621en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOda, D=7006186359en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAzzouz, H=6506173872en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTytgat, GNJ=35966168300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGroen, AK=35242574800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats