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Article: Aggregation kinetics of low density lipoproteins upon exposure to sphingomyelinase

TitleAggregation kinetics of low density lipoproteins upon exposure to sphingomyelinase
Authors
KeywordsAggregation
Dynamic light scattering
LDL
Mass action
Sphingomyelinase
Issue Date2004
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcis
Citation
Journal Of Colloid And Interface Science, 2004, v. 279 n. 1, p. 109-116 How to Cite?
AbstractThe response-to-retention hypothesis in atherosclerosis states that subendothelial retention of cholesterol-rich, atherogenic lipoproteins is the central pathogenic event that is both necessary and sufficient to provoke lesion initiation in an otherwise normal artery. Sphingomyelinase-induced aggregation of low density lipoproteins (LDL) is known to facilitate LDL retention, and the only available measurements of LDL aggregates suggest LDL aggregate size is approximately 100 nm. This study investigates the hypothesis that LDL aggregate size is determined by the relative rates of sphingomyelinase hydrolysis and LDL collisions. Using a combination of dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy to measure aggregation kinetics and particle sizes, a mass action model was developed to describe the aggregation process. It is found that LDL aggregation is sensitive to the relative amounts of sphingomyelinase and LDL and to pH. Model rate parameters were fit to experimental data in vitro and used to predict LDL aggregate sizes in vivo. The value of 100 nm in vivo does not appear to be fixed; rather, it is the value expected for the prevailing enzyme-to-LDL molar ratio. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92512
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.782
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.126
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuarino, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTulenko, TNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWrenn, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:48:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:48:30Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Colloid And Interface Science, 2004, v. 279 n. 1, p. 109-116en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9797en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92512-
dc.description.abstractThe response-to-retention hypothesis in atherosclerosis states that subendothelial retention of cholesterol-rich, atherogenic lipoproteins is the central pathogenic event that is both necessary and sufficient to provoke lesion initiation in an otherwise normal artery. Sphingomyelinase-induced aggregation of low density lipoproteins (LDL) is known to facilitate LDL retention, and the only available measurements of LDL aggregates suggest LDL aggregate size is approximately 100 nm. This study investigates the hypothesis that LDL aggregate size is determined by the relative rates of sphingomyelinase hydrolysis and LDL collisions. Using a combination of dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy to measure aggregation kinetics and particle sizes, a mass action model was developed to describe the aggregation process. It is found that LDL aggregation is sensitive to the relative amounts of sphingomyelinase and LDL and to pH. Model rate parameters were fit to experimental data in vitro and used to predict LDL aggregate sizes in vivo. The value of 100 nm in vivo does not appear to be fixed; rather, it is the value expected for the prevailing enzyme-to-LDL molar ratio. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcisen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Colloid and Interface Scienceen_HK
dc.subjectAggregationen_HK
dc.subjectDynamic light scatteringen_HK
dc.subjectLDLen_HK
dc.subjectMass actionen_HK
dc.subjectSphingomyelinaseen_HK
dc.titleAggregation kinetics of low density lipoproteins upon exposure to sphingomyelinaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcis.2004.06.066en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15380418-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4544321453en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4544321453&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume279en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage109en_HK
dc.identifier.epage116en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224708300012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuarino, AJ=7103082239en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTulenko, TN=7005077545en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWrenn, SP=6603940041en_HK

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