File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Insulin Resistance and Incident Gallbladder Disease in Pregnancy

TitleInsulin Resistance and Incident Gallbladder Disease in Pregnancy
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cgh
Citation
Clinical Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 2008, v. 6 n. 1, p. 76-81 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground & Aims: Insulin resistance is associated with prevalent gallstones, but its effect on initial gallstone formation is not well-understood. Methods: We conducted a nested case-control study to examine whether insulin resistance is a risk factor for initial gallbladder sludge and stone formation during pregnancy. Cases were 205 women with new gallbladder sludge and stones during pregnancy and the early postpartum. Controls were 443 randomly selected women without sludge or stones during pregnancy. Gallbladder ultrasounds were obtained during each trimester and at 4-6 weeks post partum. Fasting serum glucose, lipids, and insulin were measured at 26-28 weeks gestation. Insulin resistance was measured by the homeostasis model. Logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for gallstone formation. Results: Insulin resistance was significantly greater in cases than in controls on univariate analysis (P < .001). Pre-pregnancy body mass index was strongly associated with gallstone formation on univariate analysis (P < .001), but this association was diminished after adjusting for insulin resistance (P = .01). On multivariate analysis, insulin resistance was significantly associated with gallstone formation (P = .004), even after adjustment for pre-pregnancy body mass index and other confounding factors including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and physical activity. This association was strongest in women with pre-pregnancy body mass index <30 kg/m 2. Conclusions: Insulin resistance is a risk factor for incident gallbladder sludge and stones during pregnancy, even after adjustment for body mass index. Insulin resistance might represent a causal link between obesity and overweight and gallstones. © 2008 AGA Institute.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92505
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.68
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.744
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBeresford, SAAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchulte, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:48:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:48:17Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 2008, v. 6 n. 1, p. 76-81en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1542-3565en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92505-
dc.description.abstractBackground & Aims: Insulin resistance is associated with prevalent gallstones, but its effect on initial gallstone formation is not well-understood. Methods: We conducted a nested case-control study to examine whether insulin resistance is a risk factor for initial gallbladder sludge and stone formation during pregnancy. Cases were 205 women with new gallbladder sludge and stones during pregnancy and the early postpartum. Controls were 443 randomly selected women without sludge or stones during pregnancy. Gallbladder ultrasounds were obtained during each trimester and at 4-6 weeks post partum. Fasting serum glucose, lipids, and insulin were measured at 26-28 weeks gestation. Insulin resistance was measured by the homeostasis model. Logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for gallstone formation. Results: Insulin resistance was significantly greater in cases than in controls on univariate analysis (P < .001). Pre-pregnancy body mass index was strongly associated with gallstone formation on univariate analysis (P < .001), but this association was diminished after adjusting for insulin resistance (P = .01). On multivariate analysis, insulin resistance was significantly associated with gallstone formation (P = .004), even after adjustment for pre-pregnancy body mass index and other confounding factors including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and physical activity. This association was strongest in women with pre-pregnancy body mass index <30 kg/m 2. Conclusions: Insulin resistance is a risk factor for incident gallbladder sludge and stones during pregnancy, even after adjustment for body mass index. Insulin resistance might represent a causal link between obesity and overweight and gallstones. © 2008 AGA Institute.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cghen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatologyen_HK
dc.titleInsulin Resistance and Incident Gallbladder Disease in Pregnancyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cgh.2007.10.007en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18065273-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2693050-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37449000088en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37449000088&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage76en_HK
dc.identifier.epage81en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000252354200015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, CW=7202596492en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeresford, SAA=7006403537en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchulte, SJ=7006502482en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats