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Article: Contribution of metabolic factors to alanine aminotransferase activity in persons with other causes of liver disease

TitleContribution of metabolic factors to alanine aminotransferase activity in persons with other causes of liver disease
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2005
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 2005, v. 128 n. 3, p. 627-635 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground & Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been defined by the presence of hepatic steatosis in the absence of other chronic liver diseases. We sought to determine whether obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome, which are the main risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, are associated with similar elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase activity in persons with and those without other causes of chronic liver disease. Methods: Adult participants of the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were divided into those with causes of chronic liver disease (n = 1037), defined as viral hepatitis, excessive alcohol consumption, or increased transferrin-iron saturation, and those without (n = 8004). Results: Among persons with other causes of chronic liver disease, obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 4.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-9.4), insulin resistance (adjusted odds ratio, 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0-15.5, comparing the highest and the lowest quartile), and the metabolic syndrome (adjusted odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-8.0) were all strongly associated with increased alanine aminotransferase activity (>43 IU/L). Among persons without other causes of chronic liver disease, statistically similar associations were identified. Conclusions: Obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome are strong predictors of increased alanine aminotransferase activity in the US population, both in persons with and in persons without other causes of chronic liver disease. We hypothesize that metabolic fatty liver disease related to these conditions is the cause of the increased alanine aminotransferase activity and may be underrecognized in persons with other causes of chronic liver disease. © 2005 by the American Gastroenterological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92497
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIoannou, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, NSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBoyko, EJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKahn, SEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:48:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 2005, v. 128 n. 3, p. 627-635en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92497-
dc.description.abstractBackground & Aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been defined by the presence of hepatic steatosis in the absence of other chronic liver diseases. We sought to determine whether obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome, which are the main risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, are associated with similar elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase activity in persons with and those without other causes of chronic liver disease. Methods: Adult participants of the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were divided into those with causes of chronic liver disease (n = 1037), defined as viral hepatitis, excessive alcohol consumption, or increased transferrin-iron saturation, and those without (n = 8004). Results: Among persons with other causes of chronic liver disease, obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 4.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-9.4), insulin resistance (adjusted odds ratio, 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0-15.5, comparing the highest and the lowest quartile), and the metabolic syndrome (adjusted odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-8.0) were all strongly associated with increased alanine aminotransferase activity (>43 IU/L). Among persons without other causes of chronic liver disease, statistically similar associations were identified. Conclusions: Obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome are strong predictors of increased alanine aminotransferase activity in the US population, both in persons with and in persons without other causes of chronic liver disease. We hypothesize that metabolic fatty liver disease related to these conditions is the cause of the increased alanine aminotransferase activity and may be underrecognized in persons with other causes of chronic liver disease. © 2005 by the American Gastroenterological Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.titleContribution of metabolic factors to alanine aminotransferase activity in persons with other causes of liver diseaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1053/j.gastro.2004.12.004en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15810122-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-15744377647en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-15744377647&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume128en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage627en_HK
dc.identifier.epage635en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227446100016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIoannou, GN=35595023000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeiss, NS=35406927700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoyko, EJ=7005703432en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKahn, SE=24325826400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK

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