File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Origin of Oxysterols in Hepatic Bile of Patients With Biliary Infection

TitleOrigin of Oxysterols in Hepatic Bile of Patients With Biliary Infection
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2003
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
Citation
American Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2003, v. 98 n. 10, p. 2275-2280 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: Oxysterols are ubiquitous in the body and are potential cytotoxic agents in addition to being metabolic regulators. Although bile contains high concentrations of cholesterol, oxysterol concentrations in bile and the effect of infection on oxysterol levels have not been measured, nor has their origin been studied. The purpose of this study was to determine if infection of the biliary tract was associated with increased concentrations of oxysterols in the bile and, if so, which oxysterols showed a significant change. METHODS: Hepatic bile was obtained from eight patients with biliary tract disease by means of a naso-biliary catheter. Oxysterols were extracted and purified by solid-phase extraction, derivatized and measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The following were quantified in hepatic bile: 7-α-hydroxycholesterol, 7-β-hydroxycholesterol, cholestan-3-beta,5-alpha,6-β-triol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, 26-hydroxycholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, and 7-α -hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one. Total oxysterols in hepatic bile ranged from 0.133 μmol/L to 7.748 μmol/L (1.47 ± 2.55 μmol/L). Levels of 7-α-hydroxycholesterol and 7-β-hydroxycholesterol were increased in infected bile (14.2 ± 15.1 × 10 -3% of cholesterol vs 1. 9 ± 0.5 × 10 -3% of cholesterol, p < 0.05, and 22.0 ± 25.0 × 10 -3% of cholesterol vs 1.6 ± 1.2 × 10 -3% of cholesterol, p < 0.05, respectively). Serum C-reactive protein levels correlated positively with biliary levels of 7-α-hydroxycholesterol (R = 0.948), 7-β-hydroxycholesterol (R = 0.976), cholestan-3-beta,5-alpha,6-β-triol (R = 0.823), 7-α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (R = 0.846,) and 7-ketocholesterol (R = 0.973). Different oxysterols were found in gallstones, chiefly 3-keto-cholest-4-ene (624 ± 316 parts per million [ppm] of dry weight), 3-ketocholesta-4,6-diene (240 ± 329 ppm) and 7-keto-cholesterol (77 ± 81 ppm). Incubation of human leukocytes with model bile in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide resulted in changes in sterol composition, including increases in oxysterols. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified and quantified oxysterols from uninfected and infected human hepatic bile and from gallstones and gallbladder bile. Biliary infection may be involved in the biogenesis of oxysterols in bile through the production of reactive oxygen species from activated leukocytes. © 2003 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92491
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.383
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.946
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYoshida, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorMatsuzaki, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGeoffrey Haigh, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFukushima, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIkezawa, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:47:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:47:53Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2003, v. 98 n. 10, p. 2275-2280en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9270en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92491-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Oxysterols are ubiquitous in the body and are potential cytotoxic agents in addition to being metabolic regulators. Although bile contains high concentrations of cholesterol, oxysterol concentrations in bile and the effect of infection on oxysterol levels have not been measured, nor has their origin been studied. The purpose of this study was to determine if infection of the biliary tract was associated with increased concentrations of oxysterols in the bile and, if so, which oxysterols showed a significant change. METHODS: Hepatic bile was obtained from eight patients with biliary tract disease by means of a naso-biliary catheter. Oxysterols were extracted and purified by solid-phase extraction, derivatized and measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The following were quantified in hepatic bile: 7-α-hydroxycholesterol, 7-β-hydroxycholesterol, cholestan-3-beta,5-alpha,6-β-triol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, 26-hydroxycholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, and 7-α -hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one. Total oxysterols in hepatic bile ranged from 0.133 μmol/L to 7.748 μmol/L (1.47 ± 2.55 μmol/L). Levels of 7-α-hydroxycholesterol and 7-β-hydroxycholesterol were increased in infected bile (14.2 ± 15.1 × 10 -3% of cholesterol vs 1. 9 ± 0.5 × 10 -3% of cholesterol, p < 0.05, and 22.0 ± 25.0 × 10 -3% of cholesterol vs 1.6 ± 1.2 × 10 -3% of cholesterol, p < 0.05, respectively). Serum C-reactive protein levels correlated positively with biliary levels of 7-α-hydroxycholesterol (R = 0.948), 7-β-hydroxycholesterol (R = 0.976), cholestan-3-beta,5-alpha,6-β-triol (R = 0.823), 7-α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (R = 0.846,) and 7-ketocholesterol (R = 0.973). Different oxysterols were found in gallstones, chiefly 3-keto-cholest-4-ene (624 ± 316 parts per million [ppm] of dry weight), 3-ketocholesta-4,6-diene (240 ± 329 ppm) and 7-keto-cholesterol (77 ± 81 ppm). Incubation of human leukocytes with model bile in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide resulted in changes in sterol composition, including increases in oxysterols. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified and quantified oxysterols from uninfected and infected human hepatic bile and from gallstones and gallbladder bile. Biliary infection may be involved in the biogenesis of oxysterols in bile through the production of reactive oxygen species from activated leukocytes. © 2003 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Gastroenterologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.titleOrigin of Oxysterols in Hepatic Bile of Patients With Biliary Infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1572-0241.2003.07703.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid14572579-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0142152594en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0142152594&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume98en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2275en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2280en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186037200028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYoshida, T=7501314130en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMatsuzaki, Y=7201743290en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeoffrey Haigh, W=6508330398en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFukushima, S=7202543101en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIkezawa, K=36777628700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTanaka, N=7404272243en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats