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Article: The prevalence and predictors of elevated serum aminotransferase activity in the United States in 1999-2002

TitleThe prevalence and predictors of elevated serum aminotransferase activity in the United States in 1999-2002
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2006
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
Citation
American Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2006, v. 101 n. 1, p. 76-82 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: The presence of elevated serum aminotransferase activity is a sign of possible underlying liver disease. We aimed to describe the prevalence and associations of elevated serum aminotransferase activity in a recent, nationally representative U.S. survey. METHODS: We described the prevalence and predictors of elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT >43 IU/L) or elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST >40 IU/L) activity among 6,823 participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted between 1999 and 2002. We compared our findings to the results already published based on the NHANES conducted between 1988 and 1994. RESULTS: In NHANES 1999-2002, the prevalences of elevated ALT, AST, or either ALT or AST were 8.9%, 4.9%, and 9.8%, respectively, in the entire population and 7.3%, 3.6%, and 8.1%, respectively, after excluding participants who tested positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody or reported excessive alcohol consumption. Strong predictors of elevated ALT activity included increasing waist circumference and body mass index, alcohol consumption, male sex, Mexican American ethnicity, decreasing age, and presence of HCV antibody. In NHANES 1988-1994, which employed a different assay methodology, the prevalences of elevated aminotransferases were approximately half of the prevalences we describe in NHANES 1999-2002, but the predictors of elevated ALT activity were similar. CONCLUSIONS: The current prevalence of elevated ALT activity in the United States (8.9%) is more than double that of previously available estimates. This prevalence is very high (7.3%) even among persons without viral hepatitis C or excessive alcohol consumption and is strongly associated with risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. © 2006 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology Published by Blackwell Publishing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92481
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.383
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.946
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIoannou, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBoyko, EJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:47:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:47:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2006, v. 101 n. 1, p. 76-82en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9270en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92481-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The presence of elevated serum aminotransferase activity is a sign of possible underlying liver disease. We aimed to describe the prevalence and associations of elevated serum aminotransferase activity in a recent, nationally representative U.S. survey. METHODS: We described the prevalence and predictors of elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT >43 IU/L) or elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST >40 IU/L) activity among 6,823 participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted between 1999 and 2002. We compared our findings to the results already published based on the NHANES conducted between 1988 and 1994. RESULTS: In NHANES 1999-2002, the prevalences of elevated ALT, AST, or either ALT or AST were 8.9%, 4.9%, and 9.8%, respectively, in the entire population and 7.3%, 3.6%, and 8.1%, respectively, after excluding participants who tested positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody or reported excessive alcohol consumption. Strong predictors of elevated ALT activity included increasing waist circumference and body mass index, alcohol consumption, male sex, Mexican American ethnicity, decreasing age, and presence of HCV antibody. In NHANES 1988-1994, which employed a different assay methodology, the prevalences of elevated aminotransferases were approximately half of the prevalences we describe in NHANES 1999-2002, but the predictors of elevated ALT activity were similar. CONCLUSIONS: The current prevalence of elevated ALT activity in the United States (8.9%) is more than double that of previously available estimates. This prevalence is very high (7.3%) even among persons without viral hepatitis C or excessive alcohol consumption and is strongly associated with risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. © 2006 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology Published by Blackwell Publishing.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Gastroenterologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.titleThe prevalence and predictors of elevated serum aminotransferase activity in the United States in 1999-2002en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1572-0241.2005.00341.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16405537-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644854337en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644854337&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume101en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage76en_HK
dc.identifier.epage82en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1572-0241-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234412000015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIoannou, GN=35595023000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoyko, EJ=7005703432en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK

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