File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Physical chemistry of intestinal absorption of biliary cholesterol in mice

TitlePhysical chemistry of intestinal absorption of biliary cholesterol in mice
Authors
KeywordsAnimal Experiment
Animal Tissue
Article
Biliary Excretion
Catheter
Cholesterol Bile Level
Cholesterol Transport
Controlled Study
Crystallization
Duodenum
Feces Analysis
Gallbladder
Human
Human Tissue
Intestine Absorption
Intestine Cell
Jejunum
Male
Micelle
Modulation
Molecular Model
Mouse
Nonhuman
Physical Chemistry
Priority Journal
Protein Expression
Radioactivity
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hepatology.org/
Citation
Hepatology, 2008, v. 48 n. 1, p. 177-185 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough many putative sterol transporters influencing cholesterol absorption and physical-chemical factors affecting dietary cholesterol absorption have been extensively investigated, it is still unclear how biliary cholesterol contributes to the regulation of intestinal cholesterol absorption. We studied whether the gallbladder can modulate the microaggregates of cholesterol carriers, which may in turn influence the intestinal absorption of biliary cholesterol. Supersaturated, crystallized, or micellar model biles were delivered via a duodenal catheter to conscious, freely moving C57L mice daily for 2 days. Intestinal uptake and absorption of biliary cholesterol and its fecal excretion, as well as expression levels of intestinal sterol transporters, were analyzed. Cholesterol uptake and absorption by the enterocyte were dramatically reduced in mice treated with crystallized biles compared with supersaturated biles. This correlated with the higher cumulative radioactivity of cholesterol recovered in the feces at 24 hours. Such findings were absent with the added reference compound sitostanol. After removing cholesterol crystals from crystallized biles, micellar biles showed essentially identical effects on intestinal absorption but with lower fecal cholesterol excretion compared with the original samples containing crystals. Expression levels of the jejunal Abcg5 (ATP-binding cassette transporter G5) and Abcg8, but not Npc1l1 (Niemann-Pick C1 like 1), were significantly increased by supersaturated biles compared with crystallized biles. Conclusion: Different physical forms of biliary cholesterol dramatically determine intestinal uptake and absorption of cholesterol. Solid plate-like cholesterol monohydrate crystals in bile are probably not absorbed and are totally excreted in feces from the body. The gallbladder may have a role in regulating cholesterol homeostasis by modulating the physical forms of biliary cholesterol. Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92466
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.711
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.752
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, DQHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:47:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:47:06Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHepatology, 2008, v. 48 n. 1, p. 177-185en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0270-9139en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92466-
dc.description.abstractAlthough many putative sterol transporters influencing cholesterol absorption and physical-chemical factors affecting dietary cholesterol absorption have been extensively investigated, it is still unclear how biliary cholesterol contributes to the regulation of intestinal cholesterol absorption. We studied whether the gallbladder can modulate the microaggregates of cholesterol carriers, which may in turn influence the intestinal absorption of biliary cholesterol. Supersaturated, crystallized, or micellar model biles were delivered via a duodenal catheter to conscious, freely moving C57L mice daily for 2 days. Intestinal uptake and absorption of biliary cholesterol and its fecal excretion, as well as expression levels of intestinal sterol transporters, were analyzed. Cholesterol uptake and absorption by the enterocyte were dramatically reduced in mice treated with crystallized biles compared with supersaturated biles. This correlated with the higher cumulative radioactivity of cholesterol recovered in the feces at 24 hours. Such findings were absent with the added reference compound sitostanol. After removing cholesterol crystals from crystallized biles, micellar biles showed essentially identical effects on intestinal absorption but with lower fecal cholesterol excretion compared with the original samples containing crystals. Expression levels of the jejunal Abcg5 (ATP-binding cassette transporter G5) and Abcg8, but not Npc1l1 (Niemann-Pick C1 like 1), were significantly increased by supersaturated biles compared with crystallized biles. Conclusion: Different physical forms of biliary cholesterol dramatically determine intestinal uptake and absorption of cholesterol. Solid plate-like cholesterol monohydrate crystals in bile are probably not absorbed and are totally excreted in feces from the body. The gallbladder may have a role in regulating cholesterol homeostasis by modulating the physical forms of biliary cholesterol. Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hepatology.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHepatologyen_HK
dc.subjectAnimal Experimenten_HK
dc.subjectAnimal Tissueen_HK
dc.subjectArticleen_HK
dc.subjectBiliary Excretionen_HK
dc.subjectCatheteren_HK
dc.subjectCholesterol Bile Levelen_HK
dc.subjectCholesterol Transporten_HK
dc.subjectControlled Studyen_HK
dc.subjectCrystallizationen_HK
dc.subjectDuodenumen_HK
dc.subjectFeces Analysisen_HK
dc.subjectGallbladderen_HK
dc.subjectHumanen_HK
dc.subjectHuman Tissueen_HK
dc.subjectIntestine Absorptionen_HK
dc.subjectIntestine Cellen_HK
dc.subjectJejunumen_HK
dc.subjectMaleen_HK
dc.subjectMicelleen_HK
dc.subjectModulationen_HK
dc.subjectMolecular Modelen_HK
dc.subjectMouseen_HK
dc.subjectNonhumanen_HK
dc.subjectPhysical Chemistryen_HK
dc.subjectPriority Journalen_HK
dc.subjectProtein Expressionen_HK
dc.subjectRadioactivityen_HK
dc.titlePhysical chemistry of intestinal absorption of biliary cholesterol in miceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hep.22286en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18506855-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-47149096885en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-47149096885&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume48en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage177en_HK
dc.identifier.epage185en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257301100022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, DQH=35491978300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats