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Article: Newspaper editorial discourse and the politics of self-censorship in Hong Kong

TitleNewspaper editorial discourse and the politics of self-censorship in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Journalistic objectivity
Language and politics
Media self-censorship
Newspaper editorial discourse
Positioning theory
Issue Date2006
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105519
Citation
Discourse And Society, 2006, v. 17 n. 3, p. 331-358 How to Cite?
AbstractIn transitional societies where political pressure on the press is coupled with a commercial media system and a professional journalistic culture, the politics of self-censorship is likely to involve a strategic contest between the media and political actors. Language plays a significant role in this contest. The present study focuses on the case of Hong Kong. It analyzes how two local newspapers, facing an important yet sensitive political issue, constructed two different overall storylines and used two different sets of discursive strategies in their editorials to handle political pressure, market credibility, and journalistic integrity simultaneously. The elite-oriented Ming Pao constructed a storyline of the debate as a factional struggle in order to posit itself as an impartial arbitrator. This approach was further sustained and justified by the discursive strategies of balanced and qualified criticisms and the rhetoric of rational discussion. The mass-oriented Apple Daily, on the other hand, constructed a storyline of a sovereign people whose rights are encroached upon by a powerful entity. The paper was therefore much more critical towards the power center. Nevertheless, it also appropriated the dominant discourse, constructed internal contradictions, and decentralized the Chinese central government to smooth out the radicalism of its criticisms. Copyright © 2006 SAGE Publication.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92430
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.137
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.720
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, FLFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, AMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:45:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:45:54Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDiscourse And Society, 2006, v. 17 n. 3, p. 331-358en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0957-9265en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92430-
dc.description.abstractIn transitional societies where political pressure on the press is coupled with a commercial media system and a professional journalistic culture, the politics of self-censorship is likely to involve a strategic contest between the media and political actors. Language plays a significant role in this contest. The present study focuses on the case of Hong Kong. It analyzes how two local newspapers, facing an important yet sensitive political issue, constructed two different overall storylines and used two different sets of discursive strategies in their editorials to handle political pressure, market credibility, and journalistic integrity simultaneously. The elite-oriented Ming Pao constructed a storyline of the debate as a factional struggle in order to posit itself as an impartial arbitrator. This approach was further sustained and justified by the discursive strategies of balanced and qualified criticisms and the rhetoric of rational discussion. The mass-oriented Apple Daily, on the other hand, constructed a storyline of a sovereign people whose rights are encroached upon by a powerful entity. The paper was therefore much more critical towards the power center. Nevertheless, it also appropriated the dominant discourse, constructed internal contradictions, and decentralized the Chinese central government to smooth out the radicalism of its criticisms. Copyright © 2006 SAGE Publication.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105519en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDiscourse and Societyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectJournalistic objectivityen_HK
dc.subjectLanguage and politicsen_HK
dc.subjectMedia self-censorshipen_HK
dc.subjectNewspaper editorial discourseen_HK
dc.subjectPositioning theoryen_HK
dc.titleNewspaper editorial discourse and the politics of self-censorship in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, AMY: angellin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLin, AMY=rp01355en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0957926506062371en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646521517en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646521517&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage331en_HK
dc.identifier.epage358en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1460-3624-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238259100003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, FLF=7403111942en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, AMY=7402060858en_HK

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