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Article: Contact reduces transprejudice: A study on attitudes towards transgenderism and transgender civil rights in hong kong

TitleContact reduces transprejudice: A study on attitudes towards transgenderism and transgender civil rights in hong kong
Authors
KeywordsAttitudes
Contact hypothesis
Hong Kong
Transgender
Transprejudice
Issue Date2009
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/19317611.asp
Citation
International Journal Of Sexual Health, 2009, v. 21 n. 1, p. 17-34 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines the relationship between Hong Kong Chinese people's contact with transgender/transsexual (TG/TS) people and attitudes toward transgenderism and transgender civil rights, based on Allport's Contact Hypothesis. The term transprejudice is introduced to refer to the negative valuing, stereotyping and discriminatory treatment of TG/TS people. Data are presented from a population-based survey with a random sample of 856 Hong Kong Chinese persons aged between 15 and 64, using the Chinese Attitudes towards Transgenderism and Transgender Civil Rights Scale (CATTCRS). Attitudes, assessed on both personal and institutional dimensions, are examined in relation to participants' gender, age, educational level, religiosity, and previous contact with transpeople. Results suggest that previous contact with transpeople was significantly associated with attitudes reflected in the scale; decreased social distance, decreased social discrimination, and decreased transprejudice, increased awareness of discrimination against transpeople, increased support for equal opportunities, increased support for post-operative transsexual civil rights, and increased support for anti-discrimination legislation. Our findings support the contact hypothesis, that contact has a positive effect on attitudes towards TG/TS persons. We discuss the implications of these findings for public education interventions and public policy, as well as for research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92421
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.729
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.437
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKing, MEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:45:38Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:45:38Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Sexual Health, 2009, v. 21 n. 1, p. 17-34en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1931-7611en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92421-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the relationship between Hong Kong Chinese people's contact with transgender/transsexual (TG/TS) people and attitudes toward transgenderism and transgender civil rights, based on Allport's Contact Hypothesis. The term transprejudice is introduced to refer to the negative valuing, stereotyping and discriminatory treatment of TG/TS people. Data are presented from a population-based survey with a random sample of 856 Hong Kong Chinese persons aged between 15 and 64, using the Chinese Attitudes towards Transgenderism and Transgender Civil Rights Scale (CATTCRS). Attitudes, assessed on both personal and institutional dimensions, are examined in relation to participants' gender, age, educational level, religiosity, and previous contact with transpeople. Results suggest that previous contact with transpeople was significantly associated with attitudes reflected in the scale; decreased social distance, decreased social discrimination, and decreased transprejudice, increased awareness of discrimination against transpeople, increased support for equal opportunities, increased support for post-operative transsexual civil rights, and increased support for anti-discrimination legislation. Our findings support the contact hypothesis, that contact has a positive effect on attitudes towards TG/TS persons. We discuss the implications of these findings for public education interventions and public policy, as well as for research.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/19317611.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sexual Healthen_HK
dc.subjectAttitudesen_HK
dc.subjectContact hypothesisen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectTransgenderen_HK
dc.subjectTransprejudiceen_HK
dc.titleContact reduces transprejudice: A study on attitudes towards transgenderism and transgender civil rights in hong kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKing, ME: meking@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWinter, S: sjwinter@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWebster, B: bwebster@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKing, ME=rp01341en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWinter, S=rp00971en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, B=rp00969en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19317610802434609en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62349139876en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182320-
dc.identifier.hkuros154228-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-62349139876&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage17en_HK
dc.identifier.epage34en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1931-762X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283318100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKing, ME=9268914300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWinter, S=7202247303en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, B=15066354200en_HK

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