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Article: Transgendered women of the philippines

TitleTransgendered women of the philippines
Authors
KeywordsAttitudes
Demographics
Identity
Origins
Philippines
Sexuality
Transition
Issue Date2008
Citation
International Journal Of Transgenderism, 2008, v. 10 n. 2, p. 79-90 How to Cite?
AbstractA convenience sample of 147 transgendered females (i.e., male-to-female (MtF) transgenders, or transwomen, transgendered members of a community often called bakla in the Philippines) was studied. Participants (mean 23.6 years) completed a questionnaire covering, inter alia, demographics, transition histories, sexual preferences, sexual and gender identities, experience of social attitudes towards transgenderism, as well as beliefs about the origins of their own transgenderism. Despite a level of education that was high in relation to the national average, the level of unemployment in our sample was comparatively high. Participants' family backgrounds revealed a significantly higher frequency of older sisters than younger ones. Participants differed in the ways in which they self-identified, but overwhelmingly reported early feelings of gender incongruity (i.e., in early or middle childhood) and initial transition in adolescence. Though most were at the time of the study using hormones, surgery was relatively uncommon, and sex reassignment surgery rare. While none of the participants aspired to a male identity, many anticipated that they would nevertheless be presenting as male later in their lives. An overwhelming majority reported a sexual attraction to men, the vast majority of these exclusively so. Participants commonly reported that Filipino society was unfavourably disposed towards the transgendered. Many reported rejection by their parents, though this was more common (a) by fathers, and (b) when they had earlier begun to transition. Participants most commonly cited inborn biology or God's Will as a factor underlying their own transgenderism. Very few cited social influences. © 2008 by The Haworth Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92395
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRogandoSasot, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKing, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:44:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:44:52Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Transgenderism, 2008, v. 10 n. 2, p. 79-90en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1553-2739en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92395-
dc.description.abstractA convenience sample of 147 transgendered females (i.e., male-to-female (MtF) transgenders, or transwomen, transgendered members of a community often called bakla in the Philippines) was studied. Participants (mean 23.6 years) completed a questionnaire covering, inter alia, demographics, transition histories, sexual preferences, sexual and gender identities, experience of social attitudes towards transgenderism, as well as beliefs about the origins of their own transgenderism. Despite a level of education that was high in relation to the national average, the level of unemployment in our sample was comparatively high. Participants' family backgrounds revealed a significantly higher frequency of older sisters than younger ones. Participants differed in the ways in which they self-identified, but overwhelmingly reported early feelings of gender incongruity (i.e., in early or middle childhood) and initial transition in adolescence. Though most were at the time of the study using hormones, surgery was relatively uncommon, and sex reassignment surgery rare. While none of the participants aspired to a male identity, many anticipated that they would nevertheless be presenting as male later in their lives. An overwhelming majority reported a sexual attraction to men, the vast majority of these exclusively so. Participants commonly reported that Filipino society was unfavourably disposed towards the transgendered. Many reported rejection by their parents, though this was more common (a) by fathers, and (b) when they had earlier begun to transition. Participants most commonly cited inborn biology or God's Will as a factor underlying their own transgenderism. Very few cited social influences. © 2008 by The Haworth Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Transgenderismen_HK
dc.subjectAttitudesen_HK
dc.subjectDemographicsen_HK
dc.subjectIdentityen_HK
dc.subjectOriginsen_HK
dc.subjectPhilippinesen_HK
dc.subjectSexualityen_HK
dc.subjectTransitionen_HK
dc.titleTransgendered women of the philippinesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWinter, S: sjwinter@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKing, M: meking@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWinter, S=rp00971en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKing, M=rp01341en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15532730802182185en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53349117869en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53349117869&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage79en_HK
dc.identifier.epage90en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1434-4599-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWinter, S=7202247303en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRogandoSasot, S=33068228400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKing, M=9268914300en_HK

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