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Article: Skin-derived precursors differentiate into skeletogenic cell types and contribute to bone repair

TitleSkin-derived precursors differentiate into skeletogenic cell types and contribute to bone repair
Authors
KeywordsSpecies Index: Rattus
Rodentia
Issue Date2009
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/jht
Citation
Stem Cells and Development, 2009, v. 18 n. 6, p. 893-905 How to Cite?
AbstractSkin-derived precursors (SKPs) are multipotent dermal precursors that share similarities with neural crest stem cells and that can give rise to peripheral neural and some mesodermal cell types, such as adipocytes. Here, we have asked whether rodent or human SKPs can generate other mesenchymally derived cell types, with a particular focus on osteocytes and chondrocytes. In culture, rodent and human foreskin-derived SKPs differentiated into alkaline-positive, collagen type-1-positive, mineralizing osteocytes, and into collagen type-II-positive chondrocytes that secreted chondrocyte-specific proteoglycans. Clonal analysis demonstrated that SKPs efficiently generated these skeletogenic cell types, and that they were multipotent with regard to the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. To ask if SKPs could generate these same lineages in vivo, genetically tagged, undifferentiated rat SKPs were transplanted into a tibial bone fracture model. Over the ensuing 6 weeks, many of the transplanted cells survived within the bone callus, where they were morphologically and phenotypically similar to the endogenous mesenchymal/osteogenic cells. Moreover, some transplanted cells adopted a mature osteocyte phenotype and integrated into the newly formed bone. Some transplanted cells also differentiated into chondrocytes and into smooth muscle cells and/or pericytes that were associated with blood vessels. Thus, both rodent and human SKPs generate skeletogenic cell types in culture, and the injured bone environment is sufficient to instruct SKPs to differentiate down an osteogenic lineage, in a fashion similar to the endogenous mesenchymal precursors. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92359
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.777
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.703
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
Funding Information:

This work was supported by grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. We thank Smitha Paul and Danuta Zylka for expert technical assistance. J. F. L. and J. A. B. are supported awards from the Ontario government and CIHR, respectively. F. D. M. is an HHMI International Research Scholar, and F. D. M. and D. R. K. are CRC Chairs.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLavoie, J-Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBiernaskie, JAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBagli, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlman, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorKaplan, DRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMiller, FDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:43:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:43:43Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationStem Cells and Development, 2009, v. 18 n. 6, p. 893-905en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1547-3287en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92359-
dc.description.abstractSkin-derived precursors (SKPs) are multipotent dermal precursors that share similarities with neural crest stem cells and that can give rise to peripheral neural and some mesodermal cell types, such as adipocytes. Here, we have asked whether rodent or human SKPs can generate other mesenchymally derived cell types, with a particular focus on osteocytes and chondrocytes. In culture, rodent and human foreskin-derived SKPs differentiated into alkaline-positive, collagen type-1-positive, mineralizing osteocytes, and into collagen type-II-positive chondrocytes that secreted chondrocyte-specific proteoglycans. Clonal analysis demonstrated that SKPs efficiently generated these skeletogenic cell types, and that they were multipotent with regard to the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. To ask if SKPs could generate these same lineages in vivo, genetically tagged, undifferentiated rat SKPs were transplanted into a tibial bone fracture model. Over the ensuing 6 weeks, many of the transplanted cells survived within the bone callus, where they were morphologically and phenotypically similar to the endogenous mesenchymal/osteogenic cells. Moreover, some transplanted cells adopted a mature osteocyte phenotype and integrated into the newly formed bone. Some transplanted cells also differentiated into chondrocytes and into smooth muscle cells and/or pericytes that were associated with blood vessels. Thus, both rodent and human SKPs generate skeletogenic cell types in culture, and the injured bone environment is sufficient to instruct SKPs to differentiate down an osteogenic lineage, in a fashion similar to the endogenous mesenchymal precursors. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/jhten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofStem Cells and Developmenten_HK
dc.subjectSpecies Index: Rattusen_HK
dc.subjectRodentiaen_HK
dc.titleSkin-derived precursors differentiate into skeletogenic cell types and contribute to bone repairen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, Y:ychenc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, Y=rp1318en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/scd.2008.0260en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18834279-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67651093953en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67651093953&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage893en_HK
dc.identifier.epage905en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267488800010-

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