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Article: Molecular diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

TitleMolecular diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome.
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherHumana Press, Inc.
Citation
Methods In Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), 2006, v. 336, p. 163-175 How to Cite?
AbstractThe etiologic agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new type of coronavirus, known as SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Although the SARS epidemic has subsided, many authorities, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), have warned of the possible re-emergence of this highly infectious disease. Although antibody-based diagnosis of SARS has been demonstrated to be a reliable proof of SARS infection, it is not sensitive enough for detection during the early phase of the disease. To date, based on the publicly released full genomic sequences of SARS-CoV, various molecular detection methods based on reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) have been developed. Although most of the assays have initially been focused on RNA extracted from nasopharyngeal aspirates, urine, and stools, several of the more recently developed assays have been based on the analysis of RNA extracted from plasma and serum. Such assays allow the more standardized quantitative expression of viral loads and are potentially useful for early SARS diagnosis. In this chapter, two real-time quantitative RT-PCR systems for the quantification of SARS-CoV RNA in serum are discussed. The two RT-PCR systems, one aimed toward the nucleocapsid region and the other toward the polymerase region of the virus genome, have a detection rate of up to 80% during the first week of illness. These quantitative systems are potentially useful for the early diagnosis of SARS and can also provide viral load information that might assist clinicians in making a prognostic evaluation of an infected individual.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92249
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.549

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, EKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, YMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:40:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:40:28Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMethods In Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), 2006, v. 336, p. 163-175en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1064-3745en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92249-
dc.description.abstractThe etiologic agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new type of coronavirus, known as SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Although the SARS epidemic has subsided, many authorities, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), have warned of the possible re-emergence of this highly infectious disease. Although antibody-based diagnosis of SARS has been demonstrated to be a reliable proof of SARS infection, it is not sensitive enough for detection during the early phase of the disease. To date, based on the publicly released full genomic sequences of SARS-CoV, various molecular detection methods based on reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) have been developed. Although most of the assays have initially been focused on RNA extracted from nasopharyngeal aspirates, urine, and stools, several of the more recently developed assays have been based on the analysis of RNA extracted from plasma and serum. Such assays allow the more standardized quantitative expression of viral loads and are potentially useful for early SARS diagnosis. In this chapter, two real-time quantitative RT-PCR systems for the quantification of SARS-CoV RNA in serum are discussed. The two RT-PCR systems, one aimed toward the nucleocapsid region and the other toward the polymerase region of the virus genome, have a detection rate of up to 80% during the first week of illness. These quantitative systems are potentially useful for the early diagnosis of SARS and can also provide viral load information that might assist clinicians in making a prognostic evaluation of an infected individual.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHumana Press, Inc.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)en_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshMolecular Diagnostic Techniques - methods-
dc.subject.meshRNA - blood - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshRNA, Viral - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshSARS Virus - genetics - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - diagnosis - genetics - virology-
dc.titleMolecular diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1064-3745&volume=336&spage=163&epage=75&date=2006&atitle=Molecular+diagnosis+of+severe+acute+respiratory+syndrome-
dc.identifier.emailNg, EK: ngko@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, EK=rp01364en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1385/1-59745-074-X:163-
dc.identifier.pmid16916262-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749041776en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros172809-
dc.identifier.volume336en_HK
dc.identifier.spage163en_HK
dc.identifier.epage175en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, EK=21135553700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, YM=7401935391en_HK

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