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Article: Rosiglitazone protects diabetic rats against kidney disease through the suppression of renal moncyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression
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TitleRosiglitazone protects diabetic rats against kidney disease through the suppression of renal moncyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression
 
AuthorsZheng, M1
Ye, S1
Zhai, Z2
Chen, Y2
Li, X2
Yang, G1
Fan, A1
Wang, Y3
 
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdiacomp
 
CitationJournal of Diabetes and its Complications, 2009, v. 23 n. 2, p. 124-129 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2007.11.012
 
AbstractAlthough the pathogenetic mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy (DN) have not been elucidated thoroughly, an inflammatory mechanism has been suggested to contribute to its development and progression. Moncyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 is a chemokine that can attract macrophages and T cells from the circulation to the local kidney, then activate them, and ultimately injure the renal tissue. Recent studies have demonstrated that thiazolidinediones decrease urinary albumin (ALB) excretion, which may be partly related to its anti-inflammatory action. Therefore, the effects of rosiglitazone on renal inflammation and renal injury were investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats in this study. We examined the urinary excretion rates of ALB, retinal-binding protein (RBP), and MCP-1 of normal control group (Group C, n=8), STZ-induced diabetes mellitus group (Group D, n=8), and diabetes plus rosiglitazone (5 mg{dot operator}kg-1{dot operator}day-1) treatment group (Group R, n=8) at the eighth week. The renal tissues of diabetic rats were obtained for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to examine the expression of MCP-1 mRNA. Our results showed that compared to normal control, urinary excretion rates of ALB, RBP, and MCP-1 were significantly increased in untreated diabetic rats at the eighth week. However, rosiglitazone treatment could markedly decrease all the parameters above. In addition, urinary excretion rate of MCP-1 showed positive correlations with urinary ALB excretion, urinary RBP excretion, and kidney/body weight. The expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in renal tissues were markedly up-regulated in untreated diabetic rats, and these could be notably reduced by rosiglitazone treatment. In conclusion, rosiglitazone may have a potential therapeutic target in DN, which may be partly attributed to lowering of the expression of MCP-1 in the local kidney and the urinary excretion of MCP-1. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1056-8727
2012 Impact Factor: 2.056
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.647
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2007.11.012
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000263887300008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Basic Research Program of the Science & Engineering Foundation of Anhui Education Bureau of China2006KJ318B
Nature Science Foundation of Anhui Province of China070413255X
Funding Information:

This work was supported by Grant 2006KJ318B from the Basic Research Program of the Science & Engineering Foundation of Anhui Education Bureau of China and Grant 070413255X from the Nature Science Foundation of Anhui Province of China.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZheng, M
 
dc.contributor.authorYe, S
 
dc.contributor.authorZhai, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, X
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, G
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, A
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:38:10Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:38:10Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractAlthough the pathogenetic mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy (DN) have not been elucidated thoroughly, an inflammatory mechanism has been suggested to contribute to its development and progression. Moncyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 is a chemokine that can attract macrophages and T cells from the circulation to the local kidney, then activate them, and ultimately injure the renal tissue. Recent studies have demonstrated that thiazolidinediones decrease urinary albumin (ALB) excretion, which may be partly related to its anti-inflammatory action. Therefore, the effects of rosiglitazone on renal inflammation and renal injury were investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats in this study. We examined the urinary excretion rates of ALB, retinal-binding protein (RBP), and MCP-1 of normal control group (Group C, n=8), STZ-induced diabetes mellitus group (Group D, n=8), and diabetes plus rosiglitazone (5 mg{dot operator}kg-1{dot operator}day-1) treatment group (Group R, n=8) at the eighth week. The renal tissues of diabetic rats were obtained for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to examine the expression of MCP-1 mRNA. Our results showed that compared to normal control, urinary excretion rates of ALB, RBP, and MCP-1 were significantly increased in untreated diabetic rats at the eighth week. However, rosiglitazone treatment could markedly decrease all the parameters above. In addition, urinary excretion rate of MCP-1 showed positive correlations with urinary ALB excretion, urinary RBP excretion, and kidney/body weight. The expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in renal tissues were markedly up-regulated in untreated diabetic rats, and these could be notably reduced by rosiglitazone treatment. In conclusion, rosiglitazone may have a potential therapeutic target in DN, which may be partly attributed to lowering of the expression of MCP-1 in the local kidney and the urinary excretion of MCP-1. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Diabetes and its Complications, 2009, v. 23 n. 2, p. 124-129 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2007.11.012
 
dc.identifier.citeulike3495772
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2007.11.012
 
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dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263887300008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Basic Research Program of the Science & Engineering Foundation of Anhui Education Bureau of China2006KJ318B
Nature Science Foundation of Anhui Province of China070413255X
Funding Information:

This work was supported by Grant 2006KJ318B from the Basic Research Program of the Science & Engineering Foundation of Anhui Education Bureau of China and Grant 070413255X from the Nature Science Foundation of Anhui Province of China.

 
dc.identifier.issn1056-8727
2012 Impact Factor: 2.056
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.647
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid18413206
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60049086525
 
dc.identifier.spage124
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92171
 
dc.identifier.volume23
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdiacomp
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Diabetes and its Complications
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
 
dc.titleRosiglitazone protects diabetic rats against kidney disease through the suppression of renal moncyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Anhui Medical University
  2. Anhui Provincial Hospital
  3. Anhui Medical College