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Article: Deep dyslexia and right hemisphere reading - A regional cerebral blood flow study

TitleDeep dyslexia and right hemisphere reading - A regional cerebral blood flow study
Authors
KeywordsAdult
Article
Brain Blood Flow
Case Report
Controlled Study
Dyslexia
Female
Human
Human Experiment
Male
Reading
Right Hemisphere
Task Performance
Word Recognition
Issue Date1997
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.asp
Citation
Aphasiology, 1997, v. 11 n. 12, p. 1139-1158 How to Cite?
AbstractDeep dyslexia is an acquired reading disorder that is characterized by the production of semantic reading errors, greater success when reading aloud concrete and highly imageable words, frequent visual and visual-semantic errors, morphological errors and very poor reading of nonwords. The right hemisphere hypothesis proposes that in deep dyslexia the patient is not reading with an impaired version of the normal left hemisphere reading system, and cannot use that system for reading at all. Instead, a different reading system, located in the right hemisphere is used. The right hemisphere hypothesis was examined in this study by investigating the amount of cortical activation in the left and right cerebral hemispheres of a deep dyslexic patient (L.H.) during visual word recognition. Three experimental tasks were devised to isolate a Visual Word Recognition process and a Spoken Word Production process and these tasks were administered to the deep dyslexic patient as well as another patient with left-hemisphere-damage but a different form of acquired dyslexia (surface dyslexia) and two matched control subjects. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was monitored during performance on each of the tasks. For L.H., but not the other three subjects, rCBF in the right hemisphere was greater than in the left hemisphere during Visual Word Recognition. By contrast, there was greater activation of the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere for L.H. during Spoken Word Production; this was also true of the other three subjects, but the effect was statistically significant only for L.H. These results support the right-hemisphere hypothesis of deep dyslexia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92009
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.139
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.730
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorColtheart, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Een_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:33:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:33:19Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAphasiology, 1997, v. 11 n. 12, p. 1139-1158en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0268-7038en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92009-
dc.description.abstractDeep dyslexia is an acquired reading disorder that is characterized by the production of semantic reading errors, greater success when reading aloud concrete and highly imageable words, frequent visual and visual-semantic errors, morphological errors and very poor reading of nonwords. The right hemisphere hypothesis proposes that in deep dyslexia the patient is not reading with an impaired version of the normal left hemisphere reading system, and cannot use that system for reading at all. Instead, a different reading system, located in the right hemisphere is used. The right hemisphere hypothesis was examined in this study by investigating the amount of cortical activation in the left and right cerebral hemispheres of a deep dyslexic patient (L.H.) during visual word recognition. Three experimental tasks were devised to isolate a Visual Word Recognition process and a Spoken Word Production process and these tasks were administered to the deep dyslexic patient as well as another patient with left-hemisphere-damage but a different form of acquired dyslexia (surface dyslexia) and two matched control subjects. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was monitored during performance on each of the tasks. For L.H., but not the other three subjects, rCBF in the right hemisphere was greater than in the left hemisphere during Visual Word Recognition. By contrast, there was greater activation of the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere for L.H. during Spoken Word Production; this was also true of the other three subjects, but the effect was statistically significant only for L.H. These results support the right-hemisphere hypothesis of deep dyslexia.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAphasiologyen_HK
dc.subjectAdulten_HK
dc.subjectArticleen_HK
dc.subjectBrain Blood Flowen_HK
dc.subjectCase Reporten_HK
dc.subjectControlled Studyen_HK
dc.subjectDyslexiaen_HK
dc.subjectFemaleen_HK
dc.subjectHumanen_HK
dc.subjectHuman Experimenten_HK
dc.subjectMaleen_HK
dc.subjectReadingen_HK
dc.subjectRight Hemisphereen_HK
dc.subjectTask Performanceen_HK
dc.subjectWord Recognitionen_HK
dc.titleDeep dyslexia and right hemisphere reading - A regional cerebral blood flow studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, B: weekes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, B=rp01390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030736001en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030736001&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1139en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1158en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, B=6701924212en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridColtheart, M=7006573949en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGordon, E=7202355699en_HK

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