File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Anomia and dyslexia in Chinese: A familiar story?

TitleAnomia and dyslexia in Chinese: A familiar story?
Authors
KeywordsAdult
Anomia
Article
Case Report
Chinese
Clinical Feature
Dyslexia
Female
Human
Male
Neuropsychological Test
Reading
Speech Articulation
Task Performance
Issue Date1998
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.asp
Citation
Aphasiology, 1998, v. 12 n. 1, p. 77-98 How to Cite?
AbstractWe report a study investigating the factors that predict the naming performance of four Chinese-speaking anomic patients. The results showed that the rated familiarity of an item predicts naming performance for all of the patients, a finding that is consistent with data from studies of English-speaking anomic patients. These data are discussed in terms of current models of spoken word production that have been developed largely on the basis of data from English speakers. We also investigated the relationship between anemia and dyslexia for each patient by presenting 232 items to name from pictorial input and from print. The results showed that there was a highly significant correlation between anemia and dyslexia for the same items among three of the four patients, a finding that is consistent with other studies of Chinese-speaking aphasic patients. However, for one patient there was a complete dissociation between naming and oral reading of the same items (impaired picture naming co-incident with flawless oral reading), suggesting that spoken word production and oral reading can proceed via separate cognitive systems. We offer a model of spoken word production and oral reading in chinese that assumes picture naming and oral reading rely upon functionally separate pathways to account for these data.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91998
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.139
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.730
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, BSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, MJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQun, HCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, YBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYao, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXiao, XYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:33:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:33:00Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAphasiology, 1998, v. 12 n. 1, p. 77-98en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0268-7038en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91998-
dc.description.abstractWe report a study investigating the factors that predict the naming performance of four Chinese-speaking anomic patients. The results showed that the rated familiarity of an item predicts naming performance for all of the patients, a finding that is consistent with data from studies of English-speaking anomic patients. These data are discussed in terms of current models of spoken word production that have been developed largely on the basis of data from English speakers. We also investigated the relationship between anemia and dyslexia for each patient by presenting 232 items to name from pictorial input and from print. The results showed that there was a highly significant correlation between anemia and dyslexia for the same items among three of the four patients, a finding that is consistent with other studies of Chinese-speaking aphasic patients. However, for one patient there was a complete dissociation between naming and oral reading of the same items (impaired picture naming co-incident with flawless oral reading), suggesting that spoken word production and oral reading can proceed via separate cognitive systems. We offer a model of spoken word production and oral reading in chinese that assumes picture naming and oral reading rely upon functionally separate pathways to account for these data.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAphasiologyen_HK
dc.subjectAdulten_HK
dc.subjectAnomiaen_HK
dc.subjectArticleen_HK
dc.subjectCase Reporten_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectClinical Featureen_HK
dc.subjectDyslexiaen_HK
dc.subjectFemaleen_HK
dc.subjectHumanen_HK
dc.subjectMaleen_HK
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Testen_HK
dc.subjectReadingen_HK
dc.subjectSpeech Articulationen_HK
dc.subjectTask Performanceen_HK
dc.titleAnomia and dyslexia in Chinese: A familiar story?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, BS: weekes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, BS=rp01390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031984657en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031984657&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage77en_HK
dc.identifier.epage98en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, BS=6701924212en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, MJ=7406353807en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQun, HC=6602327279en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, YB=7406588273en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYao, C=19136850500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiao, XY=7402170405en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats