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Article: Surface dyslexia and surface dysgraphia: Treatment studies and their theoretical implications

TitleSurface dyslexia and surface dysgraphia: Treatment studies and their theoretical implications
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02643294.asp
Citation
Cognitive Neuropsychology, 1996, v. 13 n. 2, p. 277-315 How to Cite?
AbstractWe report studies of a patient with acquired surface dyslexia and dysgraphia. His reading impairment was treated using the methods previously reported to be successful for surface dyslexia by Byng and Coltheart (1986); these methods were also successful with our patient. In addition, we observed, as Byng and Coltheart did, that when these methods are used there is incomplete but significant generalisation to the reading of untreated words. Connectionist simulations of the effects of damage to the language-processing system have taken this generalisation effect to be evidence that words are represented in a distributed fashion in that system; we challenge this inference, on the basis of data from our and Byng and Coltheart's patient. Our patient's spelling impairment was treated using the methods previously reported to be successful for surface dysgraphia by Behrmann (1987); these methods were also successful for our patient, and we found in addition, as did Behrmann, that the treatment effects upon spelling did not generalise to the spelling of untreated words. We consider the implications of our results for the theoretical issue of whether lexical reading and lexical spelling depend upon a common orthographic lexicon or upon separate input and output orthographic lexicons. Although our results were not entirely unequivocal in relaton to this issue, we interpret the evidence from our patient, and from analyses we report of data from the surface dyslexic and surface dysgraphic patient described by Behrmann and Bub (1992), as favouring the two-lexicon view.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91973
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.444
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.324
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorColtheart, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:32:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:32:16Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCognitive Neuropsychology, 1996, v. 13 n. 2, p. 277-315en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0264-3294en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91973-
dc.description.abstractWe report studies of a patient with acquired surface dyslexia and dysgraphia. His reading impairment was treated using the methods previously reported to be successful for surface dyslexia by Byng and Coltheart (1986); these methods were also successful with our patient. In addition, we observed, as Byng and Coltheart did, that when these methods are used there is incomplete but significant generalisation to the reading of untreated words. Connectionist simulations of the effects of damage to the language-processing system have taken this generalisation effect to be evidence that words are represented in a distributed fashion in that system; we challenge this inference, on the basis of data from our and Byng and Coltheart's patient. Our patient's spelling impairment was treated using the methods previously reported to be successful for surface dysgraphia by Behrmann (1987); these methods were also successful for our patient, and we found in addition, as did Behrmann, that the treatment effects upon spelling did not generalise to the spelling of untreated words. We consider the implications of our results for the theoretical issue of whether lexical reading and lexical spelling depend upon a common orthographic lexicon or upon separate input and output orthographic lexicons. Although our results were not entirely unequivocal in relaton to this issue, we interpret the evidence from our patient, and from analyses we report of data from the surface dyslexic and surface dysgraphic patient described by Behrmann and Bub (1992), as favouring the two-lexicon view.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02643294.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive Neuropsychologyen_HK
dc.titleSurface dyslexia and surface dysgraphia: Treatment studies and their theoretical implicationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, B: weekes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, B=rp01390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0001584607en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0001584607&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage277en_HK
dc.identifier.epage315en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, B=6701924212en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridColtheart, M=7006573949en_HK

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