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Article: Dyslexia in Chinese: Clues from Cognitive Neuropsychology

TitleDyslexia in Chinese: Clues from Cognitive Neuropsychology
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/linguistics/journal/11881
Citation
Annals Of Dyslexia, 2003, v. 53, p. 255-279 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this review, we describe a series of cognitive neuropsychological studies of Chinese speaking aphasic patients that reveal subtypes of acquired dyslexia and dysgraphia in Chinese. These subtypes can be understood with reference to a cognitive framework that assumes reading and writing to dictation in Chinese depends on the division of labor between two pathways: a lexical-semantic pathway and a direct or nonsemantic pathway. This framework generates a number of predictions about the types of literacy problems that might be observed in native Chinese speakers who are learning to read and write. We argue that the language environment, and specifically the type of script used to read and write, will play a role in determining the phenotype of dyslexia in Chinese. We conclude that dyslexia in Chinese can be caused by psycholinguistic impairments at multiple levels including orthographic, semantic (morphological), and phonological processing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91971
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.857
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYin, WGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, BSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:32:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:32:13Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Dyslexia, 2003, v. 53, p. 255-279en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0736-9387en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91971-
dc.description.abstractIn this review, we describe a series of cognitive neuropsychological studies of Chinese speaking aphasic patients that reveal subtypes of acquired dyslexia and dysgraphia in Chinese. These subtypes can be understood with reference to a cognitive framework that assumes reading and writing to dictation in Chinese depends on the division of labor between two pathways: a lexical-semantic pathway and a direct or nonsemantic pathway. This framework generates a number of predictions about the types of literacy problems that might be observed in native Chinese speakers who are learning to read and write. We argue that the language environment, and specifically the type of script used to read and write, will play a role in determining the phenotype of dyslexia in Chinese. We conclude that dyslexia in Chinese can be caused by psycholinguistic impairments at multiple levels including orthographic, semantic (morphological), and phonological processing.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/linguistics/journal/11881en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Dyslexiaen_HK
dc.titleDyslexia in Chinese: Clues from Cognitive Neuropsychologyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, BS: weekes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, BS=rp01390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0742306312en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0742306312&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.spage255en_HK
dc.identifier.epage279en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYin, WG=8108354700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, BS=6701924212en_HK

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