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Article: Action naming in dementia

TitleAction naming in dementia
Authors
KeywordsAgnosia
Anomia
Category specificity
Dementia
Verb/noun action naming
Issue Date2001
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13554794.asp
Citation
Neurocase, 2001, v. 7 n. 6, p. 459-471 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent studies of action naming in dementia report contradictory results. Some studies have shown that naming of pictured actions is impaired and indeed worse than naming of pictured objects, whereas other studies report the opposite result, i.e. action naming is better preserved than object naming. One reason for these conflicting results may be that actions vary in their relationships with object knowledge. Instrumental actions, e.g. hammering, require access to knowledge about a specific object (a tool), whereas non-instrumental actions can be named correctly without access to knowledge about a specific object, e.g. running. Moreover, many instrumental action names share a name relationship with the instrument used to perform the action (homophony), whereas other action names do not, e.g. digging. In this case report, we describe an anomic patient RS with dementia affecting his access to knowledge about objects from visual, verbal and tactile input. By contrast, RS displays relatively well-preserved knowledge and naming of actions. We found an effect of instrumentality on pictured action naming, i.e. actions that depict an actor using a tool are named less accurately than actions that depict an actor performing an action without a tool. We argue that the instrumentality effect is independent of the name relationship between the action and the object and also the visual complexity of the action. We consider several explanations of the instrumentality effect and conclude that an impairment to the areas underpinning sensory feature and sensorimotor information (specific to manipulation) can account for an effect of instrumentality on action naming in dementia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91966
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.225
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.453
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorParris, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:32:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:32:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeurocase, 2001, v. 7 n. 6, p. 459-471en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1355-4794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91966-
dc.description.abstractRecent studies of action naming in dementia report contradictory results. Some studies have shown that naming of pictured actions is impaired and indeed worse than naming of pictured objects, whereas other studies report the opposite result, i.e. action naming is better preserved than object naming. One reason for these conflicting results may be that actions vary in their relationships with object knowledge. Instrumental actions, e.g. hammering, require access to knowledge about a specific object (a tool), whereas non-instrumental actions can be named correctly without access to knowledge about a specific object, e.g. running. Moreover, many instrumental action names share a name relationship with the instrument used to perform the action (homophony), whereas other action names do not, e.g. digging. In this case report, we describe an anomic patient RS with dementia affecting his access to knowledge about objects from visual, verbal and tactile input. By contrast, RS displays relatively well-preserved knowledge and naming of actions. We found an effect of instrumentality on pictured action naming, i.e. actions that depict an actor using a tool are named less accurately than actions that depict an actor performing an action without a tool. We argue that the instrumentality effect is independent of the name relationship between the action and the object and also the visual complexity of the action. We consider several explanations of the instrumentality effect and conclude that an impairment to the areas underpinning sensory feature and sensorimotor information (specific to manipulation) can account for an effect of instrumentality on action naming in dementia.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13554794.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeurocaseen_HK
dc.subjectAgnosiaen_HK
dc.subjectAnomiaen_HK
dc.subjectCategory specificityen_HK
dc.subjectDementiaen_HK
dc.subjectVerb/noun action namingen_HK
dc.titleAction naming in dementiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, B: weekes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, B=rp01390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11788738-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035709482en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035709482&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage459en_HK
dc.identifier.epage471en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000173483200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridParris, B=15766129700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, B=6701924212en_HK

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