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Article: Environmental mercury exposure in children: South China's experience

TitleEnvironmental mercury exposure in children: South China's experience
Authors
KeywordsChildren
Chinese
Environmental exposure
Fish
Mercury
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PED
Citation
Pediatrics International, 2004, v. 46 n. 6, p. 715-721 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Environmental mercury levels significantly increased in the past decades following its increase in industrial applications. In spite of an increasing concern on the potential harmful effects of mercury on children, there is no reported data for the Chinese population. The relationship between dietary habit and environmental mercury exposure in Chinese children was studied. Methods: The hair and blood mercury levels of Chinese children aged above 3 years in 2000 March to September, were studied. Sociodemographic data, dietary habits of the past 6 months, and other risk factors for environmental mercury exposure were collected. Those children with blood mercury levels above the toxic range (i.e. > 45 nmol/L) and their family members were further evaluated and their blood and hair mercury levels were monitored before and after Fishing-Moratorium period (June to August 2000) in South China Sea. Results: Altogether, 137 Chinese children (mean age, 7.2 years) were recruited. The mean hair mercury level was 2.2 p.p.m and the mean blood mercury level was 17.6 nmol/L. There was a strong correlation (r = 0.88) between hair and blood mercury levels in our cohort. Frequency of fish consumption correlated with hair (r =0.51) and blood (r = 0.54) mercury levels. For those children who consumed fish more than 3 times/week, hair and blood mercury levels were twice as high as those who consumed fish 1-3 times/week and threefold of those who never consumed fish. Five children and 12 family members had toxic blood mercury levels. Their blood (P < 0.0001) and hair (P = 0.02) mercury levels dropped significantly after reducing fish consumption during Fishing-Moratorium period. Conclusion: Both blood and hair (i.e. Tissue) mercury levels of children in Hong Kong was elevated and correlated with the frequency of fish consumption.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91735
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.868
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.424
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:24:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:24:52Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics International, 2004, v. 46 n. 6, p. 715-721en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1328-8067en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91735-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Environmental mercury levels significantly increased in the past decades following its increase in industrial applications. In spite of an increasing concern on the potential harmful effects of mercury on children, there is no reported data for the Chinese population. The relationship between dietary habit and environmental mercury exposure in Chinese children was studied. Methods: The hair and blood mercury levels of Chinese children aged above 3 years in 2000 March to September, were studied. Sociodemographic data, dietary habits of the past 6 months, and other risk factors for environmental mercury exposure were collected. Those children with blood mercury levels above the toxic range (i.e. > 45 nmol/L) and their family members were further evaluated and their blood and hair mercury levels were monitored before and after Fishing-Moratorium period (June to August 2000) in South China Sea. Results: Altogether, 137 Chinese children (mean age, 7.2 years) were recruited. The mean hair mercury level was 2.2 p.p.m and the mean blood mercury level was 17.6 nmol/L. There was a strong correlation (r = 0.88) between hair and blood mercury levels in our cohort. Frequency of fish consumption correlated with hair (r =0.51) and blood (r = 0.54) mercury levels. For those children who consumed fish more than 3 times/week, hair and blood mercury levels were twice as high as those who consumed fish 1-3 times/week and threefold of those who never consumed fish. Five children and 12 family members had toxic blood mercury levels. Their blood (P < 0.0001) and hair (P = 0.02) mercury levels dropped significantly after reducing fish consumption during Fishing-Moratorium period. Conclusion: Both blood and hair (i.e. Tissue) mercury levels of children in Hong Kong was elevated and correlated with the frequency of fish consumption.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PEDen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatrics Internationalen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmental exposureen_HK
dc.subjectFishen_HK
dc.subjectMercuryen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis-
dc.subject.meshMaximum Allowable Concentration-
dc.subject.meshMercury - analysis - toxicity-
dc.subject.meshSeafood - adverse effects-
dc.subject.meshThreshold Limit Values-
dc.titleEnvironmental mercury exposure in children: South China's experienceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, P:patricip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1442-200x.2004.01972.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15660873-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-11844266488en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97407-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-11844266488&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume46en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage715en_HK
dc.identifier.epage721en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226384500016-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, P=7003622681en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, M=8925896400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, J=7601479992en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, W=7403972688en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike19065-

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