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Article: Viral load in patients infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus
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TitleViral load in patients infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus
 
AuthorsTo, KKW1
Chan, KH1
Li, IWS1
Tsang, TY2
Tse, H1
Chan, JFW1
Hung, IFN1
Lai, ST2
Leung, CW2
Kwan, YW2
Lau, YL1
Ng, TK2
Cheng, VCC1
Peiris, JSM1
Yuen, KY1
 
KeywordsPandemic
Serial
Stool
Urine
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32763
 
CitationJournal Of Medical Virology, 2010, v. 82 n. 1, p. 1-7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21664
 
AbstractViral shedding profile of infections caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus has not been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the viral load in different body sites. Viral loads of pandemic H1N1 virus in respiratory specimens, stool, urine, and serum were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Respiratory specimens from patients with seasonal influenza were used as historical controls. Initial pre-treatment viral load were compared between these two groups. Serial respiratory specimens from patients with pandemic H1N1 virus infection were obtained for analysis of viral dynamics. Twenty-two pandemic H1N1 cases and 44 seasonal influenza historical controls were included. The mean initial viral load before oseltamivir therapy was 1.84 x 108 copies/ml for pandemic H1N1virus compared with 3.28 x 108 copies/ml in seasonal influenza historical controls (P=0.085). Among patients with pandemic H1N1 virus infection, peak viral load occurred on the day of onset of symptoms, and declined gradually afterwards, with no virus being detectable in respiratory specimens by RT-PCR 8 days and by culture 5 days after the onset of symptoms respectively, except in one patient. Pandemic H1N1 virus was detected in stool and in urine from 4/9 and 1/14 patients, respectively. Viral culture was also positive from the stool sample with the highest viral load. Younger age was associated with prolonged shedding in the respiratory tract and higher viral load in the stool. Data from this quantitative analysis of viral shedding may have implications for formulating infection control measures. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
ISSN0146-6615
2012 Impact Factor: 2.373
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.936
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21664
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000272813000001
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Providence Foundation Limited
Hong Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

Grant sponsor: Providence Foundation Limited in memory of the late Dr. Lui Hac Minh and the University Grant Council Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR Government.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, IWS
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, TY
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, H
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW
 
dc.contributor.authorHung, IFN
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, ST
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, YW
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, TK
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCC
 
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:24:09Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:24:09Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractViral shedding profile of infections caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus has not been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the viral load in different body sites. Viral loads of pandemic H1N1 virus in respiratory specimens, stool, urine, and serum were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Respiratory specimens from patients with seasonal influenza were used as historical controls. Initial pre-treatment viral load were compared between these two groups. Serial respiratory specimens from patients with pandemic H1N1 virus infection were obtained for analysis of viral dynamics. Twenty-two pandemic H1N1 cases and 44 seasonal influenza historical controls were included. The mean initial viral load before oseltamivir therapy was 1.84 x 108 copies/ml for pandemic H1N1virus compared with 3.28 x 108 copies/ml in seasonal influenza historical controls (P=0.085). Among patients with pandemic H1N1 virus infection, peak viral load occurred on the day of onset of symptoms, and declined gradually afterwards, with no virus being detectable in respiratory specimens by RT-PCR 8 days and by culture 5 days after the onset of symptoms respectively, except in one patient. Pandemic H1N1 virus was detected in stool and in urine from 4/9 and 1/14 patients, respectively. Viral culture was also positive from the stool sample with the highest viral load. Younger age was associated with prolonged shedding in the respiratory tract and higher viral load in the stool. Data from this quantitative analysis of viral shedding may have implications for formulating infection control measures. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Virology, 2010, v. 82 n. 1, p. 1-7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21664
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21664
 
dc.identifier.eissn1096-9071
 
dc.identifier.epage7
 
dc.identifier.hkuros173901
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272813000001
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Providence Foundation Limited
Hong Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

Grant sponsor: Providence Foundation Limited in memory of the late Dr. Lui Hac Minh and the University Grant Council Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR Government.

 
dc.identifier.issn0146-6615
2012 Impact Factor: 2.373
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.936
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid19950247
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-74849115667
 
dc.identifier.spage1
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91714
 
dc.identifier.volume82
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32763
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Virology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
 
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshFeces - virology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInfant
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - genetics - isolation & purification - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshRespiratory System - virology
 
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
 
dc.subject.meshSeasons
 
dc.subject.meshUrine - virology
 
dc.subject.meshViral Load - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshVirus Cultivation
 
dc.subject.meshVirus Shedding
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.subjectPandemic
 
dc.subjectSerial
 
dc.subjectStool
 
dc.subjectUrine
 
dc.titleViral load in patients infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Princess Margaret Hospital Hong Kong