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Article: Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs

TitleQueen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2005, v. 30 n. 4, p. 391-399 How to Cite?
Abstract
Background and objective: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients requires good control of blood pressure. Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs affect tolerability and compliance. Accordingly, we surveyed side-effects in the hypertension outpatient clinic. Methods: A total of 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) were interviewed in April-May 2004 in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study. Results: The percentage of patients receiving no drug (life-style modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 3, 30, 40, 22 and 6% respectively. The proportion of patients taking calcium channel blockers, β-blockers (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, α-blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers were 65, 64, 33, 24, 4 and 7% respectively. Blood pressure on treatment was 144 ± 21/ 82 ± 11 mmHg. Among patients on antihypertensive drug therapy, 34% reported adverse effects: dizziness (9%), ankle swelling (7%), headache (5%), fatigue (4%), chest discomfort (3%) and cough (3%). Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects (OR 0.46, P = 0.008). The likelihood of experiencing side-effects was unrelated to sex, age, weight, BMI, years of treatment, number of drugs used, heart rate on treatment or compliance. Conclusions: To achieve good blood pressure control, multiple drugs are used. Thiazides are underused whereas BBs are popular. The popularity of the latter may be related to its tolerability. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91612
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.533
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Sunderland
  3. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  4. University of Hong Kong, School of Professional and Continuing Education
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:22:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:22:11Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2005, v. 30 n. 4, p. 391-399en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-4727en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91612-
dc.description.abstractBackground and objective: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients requires good control of blood pressure. Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs affect tolerability and compliance. Accordingly, we surveyed side-effects in the hypertension outpatient clinic. Methods: A total of 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) were interviewed in April-May 2004 in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study. Results: The percentage of patients receiving no drug (life-style modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 3, 30, 40, 22 and 6% respectively. The proportion of patients taking calcium channel blockers, β-blockers (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, α-blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers were 65, 64, 33, 24, 4 and 7% respectively. Blood pressure on treatment was 144 ± 21/ 82 ± 11 mmHg. Among patients on antihypertensive drug therapy, 34% reported adverse effects: dizziness (9%), ankle swelling (7%), headache (5%), fatigue (4%), chest discomfort (3%) and cough (3%). Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects (OR 0.46, P = 0.008). The likelihood of experiencing side-effects was unrelated to sex, age, weight, BMI, years of treatment, number of drugs used, heart rate on treatment or compliance. Conclusions: To achieve good blood pressure control, multiple drugs are used. Thiazides are underused whereas BBs are popular. The popularity of the latter may be related to its tolerability. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeuticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshAntihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic useen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure - drug effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveysen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypertension - drug therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen_HK
dc.titleQueen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Side-effects of antihypertensive drugsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2710.2005.00662.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15985053en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26944480136en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180181-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26944480136&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage391en_HK
dc.identifier.epage399en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2710-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000230142900011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YL=7403040297en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CP=7401968501en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike243508-

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