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Article: Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs
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TitleQueen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs
 
AuthorsCheung, BMY1 3
Wong, YL4 2
Lau, CP1
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2005, v. 30 n. 4, p. 391-399 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2005.00662.x
 
AbstractBackground and objective: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients requires good control of blood pressure. Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs affect tolerability and compliance. Accordingly, we surveyed side-effects in the hypertension outpatient clinic. Methods: A total of 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) were interviewed in April-May 2004 in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study. Results: The percentage of patients receiving no drug (life-style modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 3, 30, 40, 22 and 6% respectively. The proportion of patients taking calcium channel blockers, β-blockers (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, α-blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers were 65, 64, 33, 24, 4 and 7% respectively. Blood pressure on treatment was 144 ± 21/ 82 ± 11 mmHg. Among patients on antihypertensive drug therapy, 34% reported adverse effects: dizziness (9%), ankle swelling (7%), headache (5%), fatigue (4%), chest discomfort (3%) and cough (3%). Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects (OR 0.46, P = 0.008). The likelihood of experiencing side-effects was unrelated to sex, age, weight, BMI, years of treatment, number of drugs used, heart rate on treatment or compliance. Conclusions: To achieve good blood pressure control, multiple drugs are used. Thiazides are underused whereas BBs are popular. The popularity of the latter may be related to its tolerability. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
ISSN0269-4727
2012 Impact Factor: 2.104
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.603
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2005.00662.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000230142900011
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, CP
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:22:11Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:22:11Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractBackground and objective: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients requires good control of blood pressure. Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs affect tolerability and compliance. Accordingly, we surveyed side-effects in the hypertension outpatient clinic. Methods: A total of 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) were interviewed in April-May 2004 in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study. Results: The percentage of patients receiving no drug (life-style modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 3, 30, 40, 22 and 6% respectively. The proportion of patients taking calcium channel blockers, β-blockers (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, α-blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers were 65, 64, 33, 24, 4 and 7% respectively. Blood pressure on treatment was 144 ± 21/ 82 ± 11 mmHg. Among patients on antihypertensive drug therapy, 34% reported adverse effects: dizziness (9%), ankle swelling (7%), headache (5%), fatigue (4%), chest discomfort (3%) and cough (3%). Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects (OR 0.46, P = 0.008). The likelihood of experiencing side-effects was unrelated to sex, age, weight, BMI, years of treatment, number of drugs used, heart rate on treatment or compliance. Conclusions: To achieve good blood pressure control, multiple drugs are used. Thiazides are underused whereas BBs are popular. The popularity of the latter may be related to its tolerability. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2005, v. 30 n. 4, p. 391-399 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2005.00662.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike243508
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2005.00662.x
 
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2710
 
dc.identifier.epage399
 
dc.identifier.hkuros180181
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000230142900011
 
dc.identifier.issn0269-4727
2012 Impact Factor: 2.104
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.603
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid15985053
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26944480136
 
dc.identifier.spage391
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91612
 
dc.identifier.volume30
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
 
dc.subject.meshAntihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
 
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure - drug effects
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveys
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshHypertension - drug therapy
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPatient Compliance
 
dc.titleQueen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Background and objective: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients requires good control of blood pressure. Side-effects of antihypertensive drugs affect tolerability and compliance. Accordingly, we surveyed side-effects in the hypertension outpatient clinic. Methods: A total of 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) were interviewed in April-May 2004 in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study. Results: The percentage of patients receiving no drug (life-style modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 3, 30, 40, 22 and 6% respectively. The proportion of patients taking calcium channel blockers, &#946;-blockers (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, &#945;-blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers were 65, 64, 33, 24, 4 and 7% respectively. Blood pressure on treatment was 144 &#177; 21/ 82 &#177; 11 mmHg. Among patients on antihypertensive drug therapy, 34% reported adverse effects: dizziness (9%), ankle swelling (7%), headache (5%), fatigue (4%), chest discomfort (3%) and cough (3%). Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects (OR 0.46, P = 0.008). The likelihood of experiencing side-effects was unrelated to sex, age, weight, BMI, years of treatment, number of drugs used, heart rate on treatment or compliance. Conclusions: To achieve good blood pressure control, multiple drugs are used. Thiazides are underused whereas BBs are popular. The popularity of the latter may be related to its tolerability. &#169; 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Sunderland
  3. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  4. University of Hong Kong, School of Professional and Continuing Education