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Article: The hypertension-diabetes continuum

TitleThe hypertension-diabetes continuum
Authors
KeywordsBlood Glucose
Blood Pressure
Diabetes
Dysglycemia
Hypertension
Metabolic Syndrome
Obesity
Issue Date2010
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cardiovascularpharm.com/
Citation
Journal Of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 2010, v. 55 n. 4, p. 333-339 How to Cite?
AbstractHypertension and type 2 diabetes are both common chronic conditions that affect a major proportion of the general population. They tend to occur in the same individual, suggesting common predisposing factors, which can be genetic or environmental. Although the genes causing hypertension or diabetes await elucidation, the environmental causes of these diseases are well known. Obesity and physical activity are the 2 leading factors that predispose to both diseases. Individuals with abdominal obesity are likely to develop lipid abnormalities and elevation of blood pressure and glucose. In time, hypertension and diabetes ensue. Because of the shared etiology, there is substantial overlap between hypertension and diabetes. In the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study, 40% of the subjects in the community had either raised blood pressure or raised blood glucose. Only 42% of people with diabetes had normal blood pressure and only 56% of people with hypertension had normal glucose tolerance. The presence of hypertension or diabetes should alert the clinician to the possibility of the other condition. Obesity, lipid abnormalities, raised blood pressure, and glucose are all components of the metabolic syndrome. The syndrome therefore implies a pathologic process, which is potentially reversible in the early stages. Previous efforts targeting smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia have started to bear fruit. However, obesity is on the increase in developed and developing countries. It is now time to focus on obesity and the metabolic syndrome, which require more a public health than a pharmacologic approach. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91601
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.462
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.962
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:22:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:22:01Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 2010, v. 55 n. 4, p. 333-339en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0160-2446en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91601-
dc.description.abstractHypertension and type 2 diabetes are both common chronic conditions that affect a major proportion of the general population. They tend to occur in the same individual, suggesting common predisposing factors, which can be genetic or environmental. Although the genes causing hypertension or diabetes await elucidation, the environmental causes of these diseases are well known. Obesity and physical activity are the 2 leading factors that predispose to both diseases. Individuals with abdominal obesity are likely to develop lipid abnormalities and elevation of blood pressure and glucose. In time, hypertension and diabetes ensue. Because of the shared etiology, there is substantial overlap between hypertension and diabetes. In the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study, 40% of the subjects in the community had either raised blood pressure or raised blood glucose. Only 42% of people with diabetes had normal blood pressure and only 56% of people with hypertension had normal glucose tolerance. The presence of hypertension or diabetes should alert the clinician to the possibility of the other condition. Obesity, lipid abnormalities, raised blood pressure, and glucose are all components of the metabolic syndrome. The syndrome therefore implies a pathologic process, which is potentially reversible in the early stages. Previous efforts targeting smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia have started to bear fruit. However, obesity is on the increase in developed and developing countries. It is now time to focus on obesity and the metabolic syndrome, which require more a public health than a pharmacologic approach. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cardiovascularpharm.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cardiovascular Pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subjectBlood Glucoseen_HK
dc.subjectBlood Pressureen_HK
dc.subjectDiabetesen_HK
dc.subjectDysglycemiaen_HK
dc.subjectHypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectMetabolic Syndromeen_HK
dc.subjectObesityen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypertension - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - complications - epidemiology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.titleThe hypertension-diabetes continuumen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/FJC.0b013e3181d26430en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20422737-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951702656en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros179994-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951702656&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume55en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage333en_HK
dc.identifier.epage339en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277307900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK

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