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Article: A 3-year study of medication incidents in an acute general hospital

TitleA 3-year study of medication incidents in an acute general hospital
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2008, v. 33 n. 2, p. 109-114 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and objective: Inappropriate medication use may harm patients. We analysed medication incident reports (MIRs) as part of the feedback loop for quality assurance. Methods: From all MIRs in a university-affiliated acute general hospital in Hong Kong in the period January 2004-December 2006, we analysed the time, nature, source and severity of medication errors. Results: There were 1278 MIRs with 36 (range 15-107) MIRs per month on average. The number of MIRs fell from 649 in 2004, to 353 in 2005, and to 276 in 2006. The most common type was wrong strength/dosage (36.5%), followed by wrong drug (16.7%), wrong frequency (7.7%), wrong formulation (7.0%), wrong patient (6.9%) and wrong instruction (3.1%). 60.9%, 53.7% and 84.0% of MIRs arose from handwritten prescription (HP) rather than the computerized medication order entry in 2004, 2005 and 2006 respectively. In 43.1% of MIRs, preregistration house officers were involved. Most errors (80.2%) were detected before any drug was wrongly administered. The medications were administered in 212 cases (19.7%), which resulted in an untoward effect in nine cases (0.8%). Conclusions: The most common errors were wrong dosage and wrong drug. Many incidents involved preregistration house officers and HPs. Our computerized systems appeared to reduce medication incidents. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91567
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.833
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.638
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSong, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorChui, WCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:21:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:21:29Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2008, v. 33 n. 2, p. 109-114en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-4727en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91567-
dc.description.abstractBackground and objective: Inappropriate medication use may harm patients. We analysed medication incident reports (MIRs) as part of the feedback loop for quality assurance. Methods: From all MIRs in a university-affiliated acute general hospital in Hong Kong in the period January 2004-December 2006, we analysed the time, nature, source and severity of medication errors. Results: There were 1278 MIRs with 36 (range 15-107) MIRs per month on average. The number of MIRs fell from 649 in 2004, to 353 in 2005, and to 276 in 2006. The most common type was wrong strength/dosage (36.5%), followed by wrong drug (16.7%), wrong frequency (7.7%), wrong formulation (7.0%), wrong patient (6.9%) and wrong instruction (3.1%). 60.9%, 53.7% and 84.0% of MIRs arose from handwritten prescription (HP) rather than the computerized medication order entry in 2004, 2005 and 2006 respectively. In 43.1% of MIRs, preregistration house officers were involved. Most errors (80.2%) were detected before any drug was wrongly administered. The medications were administered in 212 cases (19.7%), which resulted in an untoward effect in nine cases (0.8%). Conclusions: The most common errors were wrong dosage and wrong drug. Many incidents involved preregistration house officers and HPs. Our computerized systems appeared to reduce medication incidents. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeuticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshDrug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitals, General - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitals, University - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMedical Order Entry Systems - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshMedication Errors - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.titleA 3-year study of medication incidents in an acute general hospitalen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2710.2007.00880.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18315775-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-40349087014en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180100-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-40349087014&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage109en_HK
dc.identifier.epage114en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2710-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253710500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSong, L=23969284300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChui, WCM=23968813900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CP=7401968501en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2486183-

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