File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Elevated serum alkaline phosphatase and peripheral arterial disease in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleElevated serum alkaline phosphatase and peripheral arterial disease in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004
 
AuthorsCheung, BMY1
Ong, KL1
Wong, LYF1
 
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijcard
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Cardiology, 2009, v. 135 n. 2, p. 156-161 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.03.039
 
AbstractBackground: Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is elevated in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We therefore examined the relationship of PAD with ALP and other liver enzymes in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Methods: The analysis included 5995 men and non-pregnant women aged ≥ 40 years with no missing data in variables of interest. PAD was defined as ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) < 0.90 in either leg. Results: Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level was associated significantly with lower ABI after adjustment for confounding factors ( p = 0.019). No significant association of ABI with other liver enzymes was found. Serum ALP level increased with increasing age, body mass index, C-reactive protein, monocyte count, serum uric acid, lead, cadmium, and prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, smoking, non-alcohol drinking, and cardiovascular diseases after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and survey years (p < 0.02). The highest quartile of serum ALP was associated with an odds ratio of 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-2.85) for PAD after adjustment for confounding factors (p for trend = 0.023). In subjects with normal kidney function (glomerular filtration rate > 90 ml/min/1.73 m2), the odds ratio increased to 4.22 (95% CI 1.45-12.35) (p = 0.010). Conclusion: Elevated serum ALP is correlated with PAD, independent of other traditional cardiovascular risk factors. © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0167-5273
2012 Impact Factor: 5.509
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.788
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.03.039
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000266884600004
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY
 
dc.contributor.authorOng, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, LYF
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:21:16Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:21:16Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is elevated in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We therefore examined the relationship of PAD with ALP and other liver enzymes in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Methods: The analysis included 5995 men and non-pregnant women aged ≥ 40 years with no missing data in variables of interest. PAD was defined as ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) < 0.90 in either leg. Results: Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level was associated significantly with lower ABI after adjustment for confounding factors ( p = 0.019). No significant association of ABI with other liver enzymes was found. Serum ALP level increased with increasing age, body mass index, C-reactive protein, monocyte count, serum uric acid, lead, cadmium, and prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, smoking, non-alcohol drinking, and cardiovascular diseases after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and survey years (p < 0.02). The highest quartile of serum ALP was associated with an odds ratio of 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-2.85) for PAD after adjustment for confounding factors (p for trend = 0.023). In subjects with normal kidney function (glomerular filtration rate > 90 ml/min/1.73 m2), the odds ratio increased to 4.22 (95% CI 1.45-12.35) (p = 0.010). Conclusion: Elevated serum ALP is correlated with PAD, independent of other traditional cardiovascular risk factors. © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Cardiology, 2009, v. 135 n. 2, p. 156-161 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.03.039
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.03.039
 
dc.identifier.epage161
 
dc.identifier.hkuros180003
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266884600004
 
dc.identifier.issn0167-5273
2012 Impact Factor: 5.509
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.788
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid18572267
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67349112786
 
dc.identifier.spage156
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91554
 
dc.identifier.volume135
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijcard
 
dc.publisher.placeIreland
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Cardiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAge Distribution
 
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshAlkaline Phosphatase - blood
 
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index
 
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGlomerular Filtration Rate
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshHypercholesterolemia - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshLiver - enzymology
 
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Vascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
 
dc.subject.meshUnited States - epidemiology
 
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
 
dc.titleElevated serum alkaline phosphatase and peripheral arterial disease in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Cheung, BMY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ong, KL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, LYF</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-09-17T10:21:16Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-09-17T10:21:16Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2009</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>International Journal Of Cardiology, 2009, v. 135 n. 2, p. 156-161</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0167-5273</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/91554</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Background: Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is elevated in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We therefore examined the relationship of PAD with ALP and other liver enzymes in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Methods: The analysis included 5995 men and non-pregnant women aged &#8805; 40&#160;years with no missing data in variables of interest. PAD was defined as ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) &lt; 0.90 in either leg. Results: Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level was associated significantly with lower ABI after adjustment for confounding factors ( p = 0.019). No significant association of ABI with other liver enzymes was found. Serum ALP level increased with increasing age, body mass index, C-reactive protein, monocyte count, serum uric acid, lead, cadmium, and prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, smoking, non-alcohol drinking, and cardiovascular diseases after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and survey years (p &lt; 0.02). The highest quartile of serum ALP was associated with an odds ratio of 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-2.85) for PAD after adjustment for confounding factors (p for trend = 0.023). In subjects with normal kidney function (glomerular filtration rate &gt; 90&#160;ml/min/1.73&#160;m2), the odds ratio increased to 4.22 (95% CI 1.45-12.35) (p = 0.010). Conclusion: Elevated serum ALP is correlated with PAD, independent of other traditional cardiovascular risk factors. &#169; 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Elsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijcard</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>International Journal of Cardiology</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Chemicals And Cas Registry Numbers</subject>
<subject.mesh>Adult</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Age Distribution</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Alkaline Phosphatase - blood</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Body Mass Index</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Glomerular Filtration Rate</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Health Surveys</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Hypercholesterolemia - epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Liver - enzymology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Logistic Models</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Middle Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Peripheral Vascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Prevalence</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Risk Factors</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>United States - epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<title>Elevated serum alkaline phosphatase and peripheral arterial disease in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.03.039</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>18572267</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-67349112786</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>180003</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67349112786&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>135</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>2</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>156</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>161</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000266884600004</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>Ireland</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong