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Article: Raising highly desirable lipoprotein versus lowering deleterious lipoprotein

TitleRaising highly desirable lipoprotein versus lowering deleterious lipoprotein
Authors
KeywordsCarotid intima-media thickness
Coronary heart disease
Ezetimibe
High-density lipoprotein cholesterol
Niacin
Issue Date2010
PublisherExpert Reviews Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.future-drugs.com/loi/ecp
Citation
Expert Review Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2010, v. 3 n. 2, p. 173-176 How to Cite?
AbstractEvaluation of: Taylor AJ, Villines TC, Stanek EJ et al. Extended-release niacin or ezetimibe and carotid intima-media thickness. N. Engl. J. Med. 361(22), 2113-2122 (2009). Epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are both factors causing coronary heart disease. These authors compared extended-release niacin, which raises HDL-C, with ezetimibe, which lowers LDL-C, in a study named Arterial Biology for the Investigation of the Treatment Effects of Reducing Cholesterol 6-HDL and LDL Treatment Strategies (ARBITER 6-HALTS). The study was terminated early and only 208 patients were included in the analysis. Ezetimibe decreased LDL-C by 19.2%, to 66 mg/dl (1.7 mmol/l), whereas niacin increased HDL-C by 18.4%. Ezetimibe did not reduce carotid intima-media thickness, whereas niacin decreased it significantly. Moreover, major adverse cardiovascular events occurred in 5% of the ezetimibe group but only 1% of the niacin group (p = 0.04). The study suggests that niacin may be more effective than ezetimibe as an adjunct to statin in regressing atherosclerosis and in preventing cardiovascular events. This small study of short duration reported a very large treatment effect, so the findings need to be confirmed in a larger longer trial. Nevertheless, it provides the evidence that we now have an additional class of drugs besides statins that can reduce atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. © 2010 Expert Reviews Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91495
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.488
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.794
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKumana, CRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:20:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:20:20Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationExpert Review Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2010, v. 3 n. 2, p. 173-176en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1751-2433en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91495-
dc.description.abstractEvaluation of: Taylor AJ, Villines TC, Stanek EJ et al. Extended-release niacin or ezetimibe and carotid intima-media thickness. N. Engl. J. Med. 361(22), 2113-2122 (2009). Epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are both factors causing coronary heart disease. These authors compared extended-release niacin, which raises HDL-C, with ezetimibe, which lowers LDL-C, in a study named Arterial Biology for the Investigation of the Treatment Effects of Reducing Cholesterol 6-HDL and LDL Treatment Strategies (ARBITER 6-HALTS). The study was terminated early and only 208 patients were included in the analysis. Ezetimibe decreased LDL-C by 19.2%, to 66 mg/dl (1.7 mmol/l), whereas niacin increased HDL-C by 18.4%. Ezetimibe did not reduce carotid intima-media thickness, whereas niacin decreased it significantly. Moreover, major adverse cardiovascular events occurred in 5% of the ezetimibe group but only 1% of the niacin group (p = 0.04). The study suggests that niacin may be more effective than ezetimibe as an adjunct to statin in regressing atherosclerosis and in preventing cardiovascular events. This small study of short duration reported a very large treatment effect, so the findings need to be confirmed in a larger longer trial. Nevertheless, it provides the evidence that we now have an additional class of drugs besides statins that can reduce atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. © 2010 Expert Reviews Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherExpert Reviews Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.future-drugs.com/loi/ecpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofExpert Review of Clinical Pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subjectCarotid intima-media thicknessen_HK
dc.subjectCoronary heart diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectEzetimibeen_HK
dc.subjectHigh-density lipoprotein cholesterolen_HK
dc.subjectNiacinen_HK
dc.titleRaising highly desirable lipoprotein versus lowering deleterious lipoproteinen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BM:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BM=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1586/ecp.10.7en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77949404320en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77949404320&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage173en_HK
dc.identifier.epage176en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BM=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKumana, CR=7005112381en_HK

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