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Article: Adrenomedullin - A potential disease activity marker and suppressor of nephritis activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleAdrenomedullin - A potential disease activity marker and suppressor of nephritis activity in systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2006
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Rheumatology, 2006, v. 45 n. 10, p. 1266-1272 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. To investigate whether plasma adrenomedullin (AM) level is elevated in lupus nephritis and to examine if plasma AM level is correlated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and severity of lupus nephritis after multivariate adjustment. Methods. Consecutive SLE patients and healthy volunteers of age ≥16 were recruited from the rheumatology clinics of two hospitals in Hong Kong. SLE patients with nephritis fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for renal involvement and had percutaneous renal biopsy performed. Subjects were divided into three groups: (i) SLE patients with nephritis, (ii) SLE patients without nephritis and (iii) normal controls. The demographic and clinical variables were compared between these groups of patients and plasma AM level was determined by radioimmunoassay. Factors associated with plasma AM level were explored by regression analysis with adjustment of confounding factors. Results. Sixty SLE patients (39 with nephritis and 21 without) and 23 normal subjects were studied. The plasma AM level of SLE patients was significantly higher than that of normal controls. SLE patients with nephritis had significantly higher plasma AM level than those without nephritis and normal controls (P <0.001). In regression analysis, proteinuria was negatively associated with plasma AM level (P =0.006) whereas SLE disease activity index was positively associated with plasma AM level after multivariate adjustment (P =0.002). Conclusions. Plasma AM is elevated in lupus nephritis, which correlates with lupus disease activity. It is negatively associated with urine protein excretion although it is unrelated to the type of renal pathology per se. Plasma AM may play a role to suppress the activity of lupus nephritis. © 2006 Oxford University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91475
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.524
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.449
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMok, CCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:20:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:20:01Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRheumatology, 2006, v. 45 n. 10, p. 1266-1272en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1462-0324en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91475-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. To investigate whether plasma adrenomedullin (AM) level is elevated in lupus nephritis and to examine if plasma AM level is correlated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and severity of lupus nephritis after multivariate adjustment. Methods. Consecutive SLE patients and healthy volunteers of age ≥16 were recruited from the rheumatology clinics of two hospitals in Hong Kong. SLE patients with nephritis fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for renal involvement and had percutaneous renal biopsy performed. Subjects were divided into three groups: (i) SLE patients with nephritis, (ii) SLE patients without nephritis and (iii) normal controls. The demographic and clinical variables were compared between these groups of patients and plasma AM level was determined by radioimmunoassay. Factors associated with plasma AM level were explored by regression analysis with adjustment of confounding factors. Results. Sixty SLE patients (39 with nephritis and 21 without) and 23 normal subjects were studied. The plasma AM level of SLE patients was significantly higher than that of normal controls. SLE patients with nephritis had significantly higher plasma AM level than those without nephritis and normal controls (P <0.001). In regression analysis, proteinuria was negatively associated with plasma AM level (P =0.006) whereas SLE disease activity index was positively associated with plasma AM level after multivariate adjustment (P =0.002). Conclusions. Plasma AM is elevated in lupus nephritis, which correlates with lupus disease activity. It is negatively associated with urine protein excretion although it is unrelated to the type of renal pathology per se. Plasma AM may play a role to suppress the activity of lupus nephritis. © 2006 Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofRheumatologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdrenomedullin - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Antinuclear - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGlucocorticoids - therapeutic useen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Status Indicatorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshKidney - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemic - blood - immunology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLupus Nephritis - blood - immunology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_HK
dc.titleAdrenomedullin - A potential disease activity marker and suppressor of nephritis activity in systemic lupus erythematosusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS:cslau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/rheumatology/kel105en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16595522-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749616661en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros134807-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33749616661&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume45en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1266en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1272en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1462-0332-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240927100015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, A=9248521200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, CC=34668219600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, R=7101876102en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike877069-

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