File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Species association in tropical montane rain forest at two successional stages in Diaoluo Mountain, Hainan

TitleSpecies association in tropical montane rain forest at two successional stages in Diaoluo Mountain, Hainan
Authors
KeywordsCommunity Succession
Dominant Species
Interspecies Association
Niche
Tropical Montane Rain Forest
Issue Date2008
PublisherGaodeng Jiaoyu Chubanshe
Citation
Frontiers of Forestry in China, 2008, v. 3 n. 3, p. 308-314 How to Cite?
AbstractSpecies association is one of the basic concepts in community succession. There are different viewpoints on how species interaction changes with the progress of succession. In order to assess these relationships, we examined species associations in the tropical montane rain forest at early and late successional stages in Diaoluo Mountain, Hainan Island. Based on data from a 2 × 2 contingency table of species presence or absence, statistical methods including analysis of species association and χ2 tests were applied. The results show that: 1) an overall positive association was present among tree species in the communities during the two successional stages and were statistically significant at the late stage. The number of species pairs with positive and negative associations decreased throughout the process of succession, while the number with null associations was greatly increased. The same trend existed among the dominant and companion species. The results indicate that the communities are developing towards a stable stage where the woody species coexist in harmony. 2) In the early-established and later invading species, all positive associations were not significant. Compared with positive and null associations, fewer negative associations were found. This implies that these species are inclined to coexist independently through portioning of resources. 3) Among the later invading species, positive associations were significant and no negative associations were found which suggest that these species have similar adaptive ability in the habitat and occupied overlapping niches in the community. © 2008 Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91377
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAn, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:18:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:18:15Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers of Forestry in China, 2008, v. 3 n. 3, p. 308-314en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1673-3517en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91377-
dc.description.abstractSpecies association is one of the basic concepts in community succession. There are different viewpoints on how species interaction changes with the progress of succession. In order to assess these relationships, we examined species associations in the tropical montane rain forest at early and late successional stages in Diaoluo Mountain, Hainan Island. Based on data from a 2 × 2 contingency table of species presence or absence, statistical methods including analysis of species association and χ2 tests were applied. The results show that: 1) an overall positive association was present among tree species in the communities during the two successional stages and were statistically significant at the late stage. The number of species pairs with positive and negative associations decreased throughout the process of succession, while the number with null associations was greatly increased. The same trend existed among the dominant and companion species. The results indicate that the communities are developing towards a stable stage where the woody species coexist in harmony. 2) In the early-established and later invading species, all positive associations were not significant. Compared with positive and null associations, fewer negative associations were found. This implies that these species are inclined to coexist independently through portioning of resources. 3) Among the later invading species, positive associations were significant and no negative associations were found which suggest that these species have similar adaptive ability in the habitat and occupied overlapping niches in the community. © 2008 Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherGaodeng Jiaoyu Chubansheen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers of Forestry in Chinaen_HK
dc.subjectCommunity Successionen_HK
dc.subjectDominant Speciesen_HK
dc.subjectInterspecies Associationen_HK
dc.subjectNicheen_HK
dc.subjectTropical Montane Rain Foresten_HK
dc.titleSpecies association in tropical montane rain forest at two successional stages in Diaoluo Mountain, Hainanen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiu, F:fordliu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, F=rp1358en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11461-008-0050-7en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-46249084853en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-46249084853&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage308en_HK
dc.identifier.epage314en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1673-3630-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats