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Article: A Systematic Review of Patient Acceptance of Consumer Health Information Technology

TitleA Systematic Review of Patient Acceptance of Consumer Health Information Technology
Authors
KeywordsReferences (156) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2009
PublisherHanley & Belfus, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jamia
Citation
Journal Of The American Medical Informatics Association, 2009, v. 16 n. 4, p. 550-560 How to Cite?
AbstractA systematic literature review was performed to identify variables promoting consumer health information technology (CHIT) acceptance among patients. The electronic bibliographic databases Web of Science, Business Source Elite, CINAHL, Communication and Mass Media Complete, MEDLINE, PsycArticles, and PsycInfo were searched. A cited reference search of articles meeting the inclusion criteria was also conducted to reduce misses. Fifty-two articles met the selection criteria. Among them, 94 different variables were tested for associations with acceptance. Most of those tested (71%) were patient factors, including sociodemographic characteristics, health- and treatment-related variables, and prior experience or exposure to computer/health technology. Only ten variables were related to human-technology interaction; 16 were organizational factors; and one was related to the environment. In total, 62 (66%) were found to predict acceptance in at least one study. Existing literature focused largely on patient-related factors. No studies examined the impact of social and task factors on acceptance, and few tested the effects of organizational or environmental factors on acceptance. Future research guided by technology acceptance theories should fill those gaps to improve our understanding of patient CHIT acceptance, which in turn could lead to better CHIT design and implementation. © 2009 J Am Med Inform Assoc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91358
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.428
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.315
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Library of MedicineNLM-LM 6249
Funding Information:

This study was funded in part by a grant from the National Library of Medicine (NLM-LM 6249) to Patricia Flatley Brennan, Pl. The authors thank Samuel Alper, Richard Holden, and A. Joy Mvera for their helpful comments on the earlier versions of the manuscript and thank the anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOr, CKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarsh, BTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:17:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:17:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Medical Informatics Association, 2009, v. 16 n. 4, p. 550-560en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1067-5027en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91358-
dc.description.abstractA systematic literature review was performed to identify variables promoting consumer health information technology (CHIT) acceptance among patients. The electronic bibliographic databases Web of Science, Business Source Elite, CINAHL, Communication and Mass Media Complete, MEDLINE, PsycArticles, and PsycInfo were searched. A cited reference search of articles meeting the inclusion criteria was also conducted to reduce misses. Fifty-two articles met the selection criteria. Among them, 94 different variables were tested for associations with acceptance. Most of those tested (71%) were patient factors, including sociodemographic characteristics, health- and treatment-related variables, and prior experience or exposure to computer/health technology. Only ten variables were related to human-technology interaction; 16 were organizational factors; and one was related to the environment. In total, 62 (66%) were found to predict acceptance in at least one study. Existing literature focused largely on patient-related factors. No studies examined the impact of social and task factors on acceptance, and few tested the effects of organizational or environmental factors on acceptance. Future research guided by technology acceptance theories should fill those gaps to improve our understanding of patient CHIT acceptance, which in turn could lead to better CHIT design and implementation. © 2009 J Am Med Inform Assoc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHanley & Belfus, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jamiaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Informatics Associationen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (156) View In Table Layouten_HK
dc.titleA Systematic Review of Patient Acceptance of Consumer Health Information Technologyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailOr, CKL:klor@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityOr, CKL=rp01369en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1197/jamia.M2888en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19390112-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2705259-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67649363324en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67649363324&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage550en_HK
dc.identifier.epage560en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1527-974X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267995500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOr, CKL=14834272300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarsh, BT=6603540921en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5661046-

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