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Article: Perception of safe robot idle time in virtual reality and real industrial environments

TitlePerception of safe robot idle time in virtual reality and real industrial environments
Authors
KeywordsHuman perception
Industrial robot
Safe robot idle time
Virtual reality
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ergon
Citation
International Journal Of Industrial Ergonomics, 2009, v. 39 n. 5, p. 807-812 How to Cite?
AbstractThe main objective of this study was to investigate human perception of safe idle time of an industrial robot in a virtual reality environment. Studying operators' perception of robot operational characteristics such as safe robot idle time can help develop hazard prevention strategies, and ultimately improve robot safety. Results of data collected from 32 participants showed that robot size and speed had significant effects on the perception of safe robot idle time. This study also examined operators' perceived acceptability level for the robot speed, perceived level of hazard of robot motion, perceived chance of error, and self-reported mental workload. Results of this study were compared to the findings of Rahimi, M., Karwowski, W. [1990. Human perception of robot safe speed and idle time. Behaviour & Information Technology 9(5), 381-389], in which their experiment was conducted in a real industrial environment. This study demonstrated the feasibility of testing human perception of dynamic moving objects in a virtual reality environment. The virtual reality technology is believed to be capable of modeling a complex machinery system such as a robotic system. Relevance to industry: Human perception of the operational characteristics of industrial robots is an important concern for robot safety since misperception can cause robot operators to err, which in turn can cause injuries and fatalities. Through this study we (1) understand human perception, safety behavior, and decision making in a robotic system and (2) demonstrate the capability of modeling a complex machinery system using virtual reality technology. Our experiments designed to study human perception of safe robot idle time could lead to safety interventions and guidelines or hazard prevention strategy development. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91354
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.592
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Department of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management at HKUST the University Grants Council (UGC)
Research Grants Council (RGC) of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The authors thank Vivian Lau and Parry Ng for their assistance in designing the experiments and test procedures, Denil Chan and Charles Ng for their technical support, and Colleen Duffy, Connie Andreana, and Davis Brown for manuscript review. The research was conducted through support of the Department of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management at HKUST the University Grants Council (UGC), and the Research Grants Council (RGC) of Hong Kong. The authors also thank the anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOr, CKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, VGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:17:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:17:36Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Industrial Ergonomics, 2009, v. 39 n. 5, p. 807-812en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0169-8141en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91354-
dc.description.abstractThe main objective of this study was to investigate human perception of safe idle time of an industrial robot in a virtual reality environment. Studying operators' perception of robot operational characteristics such as safe robot idle time can help develop hazard prevention strategies, and ultimately improve robot safety. Results of data collected from 32 participants showed that robot size and speed had significant effects on the perception of safe robot idle time. This study also examined operators' perceived acceptability level for the robot speed, perceived level of hazard of robot motion, perceived chance of error, and self-reported mental workload. Results of this study were compared to the findings of Rahimi, M., Karwowski, W. [1990. Human perception of robot safe speed and idle time. Behaviour & Information Technology 9(5), 381-389], in which their experiment was conducted in a real industrial environment. This study demonstrated the feasibility of testing human perception of dynamic moving objects in a virtual reality environment. The virtual reality technology is believed to be capable of modeling a complex machinery system such as a robotic system. Relevance to industry: Human perception of the operational characteristics of industrial robots is an important concern for robot safety since misperception can cause robot operators to err, which in turn can cause injuries and fatalities. Through this study we (1) understand human perception, safety behavior, and decision making in a robotic system and (2) demonstrate the capability of modeling a complex machinery system using virtual reality technology. Our experiments designed to study human perception of safe robot idle time could lead to safety interventions and guidelines or hazard prevention strategy development. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ergonen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Industrial Ergonomicsen_HK
dc.subjectHuman perceptionen_HK
dc.subjectIndustrial roboten_HK
dc.subjectSafe robot idle timeen_HK
dc.subjectVirtual realityen_HK
dc.titlePerception of safe robot idle time in virtual reality and real industrial environmentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailOr, CKL:klor@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityOr, CKL=rp01369en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ergon.2009.01.003en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68349160346en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68349160346&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage807en_HK
dc.identifier.epage812en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270127300019-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOr, CKL=14834272300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDuffy, VG=7007049892en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, CC=34970854300en_HK

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