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Conference Paper: Lipid biomarkers, carbon isotopes, and phylogenetic characterization of bacteria in California and Nevada hot springs

TitleLipid biomarkers, carbon isotopes, and phylogenetic characterization of bacteria in California and Nevada hot springs
Authors
Keywords16S rRNA genes
Bacteria
California and Nevada hot springs
Carbon isotopes
Cyanobacteria
Hopanoids
Lipid biomarkers
Issue Date2007
PublisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01490451.asp
Citation
Geomicrobiology Journal, 2007, v. 24 n. 6, p. 519-534 How to Cite?
Abstract
Microbial mats were collected from hot springs in California (Eagleville) and Nevada (Paradise Valley and Crescent Valley) to determine bacterial community structure and pathways of carbon cycling in different geothermal environments of the western United States. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) at Eagleville contained even-numbered fatty acids, with 16:0 being the most abundant (48.8%), followed by 18:1ω9c (17.2%), 16:1ω7c/t (6.3%), and 18:0 (6.2%), which are consistent with lipid profiles of cyanobacteria or other phototrophic bacteria. The PLFA profiles at Paradise Valley and Crescent Valley were dominated by similar even-numbered fatty acids; however, branched fatty acids such as iso- and anteiso- 15:0 and 17:0 were also abundant (up to 7.1% compared to 2.0% at Eagleville), suggesting greater relative abundance of heterotrophic bacteria in these springs. Analysis of neutral lipids was only performed on Eagleville and Paradise Valley springs, which revealed abundant bacterial hopanoids including the 2-methylbacteriohopane-32,33,34,35-tetrol (2-methylBHT) that is specific to cyanobacteria; however, the diversity of hopanoid compounds was significantly lower at Eagleville than at Paradise Valley. The carbon-isotope composition of individual PLFA averaged -30.7 ± 1.3%(n = 7) at Eagleville, -28.0 ± 1.8%(n = 3) at Crescent Valley, and -29.7 ± 3.1%(n = 12) at Paradise Valley. Carbon isotope fractionation between PLFA and CO2 was only available for Eagleville (-11.7%) and Paradise Valley (-21.7%), which indicated the predominance of the Calvin cycle for CO2 fixation in these hot springs. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were extracted from environmental samples at Eagleville and Paradise Valley but not Crescent Valley. Clone libraries indicated the predominance of cyanobacteria (50-75%) at these locations, which is consistent with the lipid profiles. Phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA genes indicated that most of the cyanobacterial sequences are unknown and may be specific to the Nevada and California hot springs. Phototrophic green non-sulfur bacteria were also present at Eagleville (13%) and Paradise Valley (7%). The remaining sequences were related to α-, β -, and γ-Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Deinococcus/Thermus, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes. However, not all of these sequences were present at each of the springs. Results of this study demonstrate the consistency among lipid profiles (phenotypes), carbon isotopes (biogeochemistry), and 16S rRNA genes (genotypes) of the bacterial community in these hot springs, which cumulatively suggest the importance of cyanobacteria in primary production of biomass under the environmental conditions examined.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91307
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.804
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory
  2. The University of Georgia
  3. Newcastle University, United Kingdom
  4. University of Tennessee, Knoxville
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRomanek, CSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMills, GLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGibson, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTalbot, HMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWiegel, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNoakes, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCulp, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhite, DCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:16:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:16:43Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGeomicrobiology Journal, 2007, v. 24 n. 6, p. 519-534en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0149-0451en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91307-
dc.description.abstractMicrobial mats were collected from hot springs in California (Eagleville) and Nevada (Paradise Valley and Crescent Valley) to determine bacterial community structure and pathways of carbon cycling in different geothermal environments of the western United States. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) at Eagleville contained even-numbered fatty acids, with 16:0 being the most abundant (48.8%), followed by 18:1ω9c (17.2%), 16:1ω7c/t (6.3%), and 18:0 (6.2%), which are consistent with lipid profiles of cyanobacteria or other phototrophic bacteria. The PLFA profiles at Paradise Valley and Crescent Valley were dominated by similar even-numbered fatty acids; however, branched fatty acids such as iso- and anteiso- 15:0 and 17:0 were also abundant (up to 7.1% compared to 2.0% at Eagleville), suggesting greater relative abundance of heterotrophic bacteria in these springs. Analysis of neutral lipids was only performed on Eagleville and Paradise Valley springs, which revealed abundant bacterial hopanoids including the 2-methylbacteriohopane-32,33,34,35-tetrol (2-methylBHT) that is specific to cyanobacteria; however, the diversity of hopanoid compounds was significantly lower at Eagleville than at Paradise Valley. The carbon-isotope composition of individual PLFA averaged -30.7 ± 1.3%(n = 7) at Eagleville, -28.0 ± 1.8%(n = 3) at Crescent Valley, and -29.7 ± 3.1%(n = 12) at Paradise Valley. Carbon isotope fractionation between PLFA and CO2 was only available for Eagleville (-11.7%) and Paradise Valley (-21.7%), which indicated the predominance of the Calvin cycle for CO2 fixation in these hot springs. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were extracted from environmental samples at Eagleville and Paradise Valley but not Crescent Valley. Clone libraries indicated the predominance of cyanobacteria (50-75%) at these locations, which is consistent with the lipid profiles. Phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA genes indicated that most of the cyanobacterial sequences are unknown and may be specific to the Nevada and California hot springs. Phototrophic green non-sulfur bacteria were also present at Eagleville (13%) and Paradise Valley (7%). The remaining sequences were related to α-, β -, and γ-Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Deinococcus/Thermus, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes. However, not all of these sequences were present at each of the springs. Results of this study demonstrate the consistency among lipid profiles (phenotypes), carbon isotopes (biogeochemistry), and 16S rRNA genes (genotypes) of the bacterial community in these hot springs, which cumulatively suggest the importance of cyanobacteria in primary production of biomass under the environmental conditions examined.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01490451.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGeomicrobiology Journalen_HK
dc.subject16S rRNA genesen_HK
dc.subjectBacteriaen_HK
dc.subjectCalifornia and Nevada hot springsen_HK
dc.subjectCarbon isotopesen_HK
dc.subjectCyanobacteriaen_HK
dc.subjectHopanoidsen_HK
dc.subjectLipid biomarkersen_HK
dc.titleLipid biomarkers, carbon isotopes, and phylogenetic characterization of bacteria in California and Nevada hot springsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, YL:yiliang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, YL=rp01354en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01490450701572515en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35148875222en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35148875222&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage519en_HK
dc.identifier.epage534en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1521-0529-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249891500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, CL=7405489900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, Z=9269381800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, YL=27171876700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRomanek, CS=6603780398en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMills, GL=7201923387en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGibson, RA=22634217300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTalbot, HM=7005953517en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWiegel, J=7007036944en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNoakes, J=7004125029en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCulp, R=7007067670en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhite, DC=7404818602en_HK

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