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Article: Spatial patterns of bacterial signature biomarkers in marine sediments of the Gulf of Mexico

TitleSpatial patterns of bacterial signature biomarkers in marine sediments of the Gulf of Mexico
Authors
KeywordsBiomarker
Gas hydrate
Gulf of Mexico
Multivariate statistics
Phospholipid fatty acids
Respiratory quinones
Trans/cis ratio
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemgeo
Citation
Chemical Geology, 2007, v. 238 n. 3-4, p. 168-179 How to Cite?
AbstractSediment cores near a cold methane seep and gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for bacterial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and isoprenoid quinones. Nearby non-seep marine sediments were also analyzed for the purpose of comparison. Our goal was to use these biomarkers as proxies for microbial community structure and redox indicators. Total PLFA varied from core to core and were significantly less abundant in non-seep marine sediments than those near the cold seep or gas hydrates. In general, saturated straight chain, terminal branched and mid-chain branched, and monounsaturated fatty acids contributed > 98% of the total PLFA. The branched fatty acids (i.e., aC15:0, iC15:0, Me10C16:0) could be largely attributed to sulfate-reducing bacteria and the monounsaturated fatty acid (i.e., 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c) could be attributed to sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (Beggiatoa/Thioploca). Principal component analysis of PLFA data revealed that microbial communities were consistent with the spatial distributions of gas hydrates and Beggiatoa mats and with the variation in geochemical conditions. Isoprenoid quinone profiles indicated that aerobic respiration was the dominant metabolic process in the top-most sediment layers while the anaerobic respiration dominated the deeper intervals in the marine sediments. Significant amount of cyclopropyl fatty acids at all sites indicated the stress adaptation of the bacteria in the extreme environment. The consistency between the distribution of PLFA and respiratory quinones and the variation in geochemical conditions suggested that analyses of PLFA and quinone could help us to locate the existence of the coupled sulfide-oxidization and sulfate-reduction processes. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91302
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.482
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.346
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeacock, ADen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhite, DCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGeyer, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, CLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:16:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:16:37Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChemical Geology, 2007, v. 238 n. 3-4, p. 168-179en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0009-2541en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91302-
dc.description.abstractSediment cores near a cold methane seep and gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for bacterial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and isoprenoid quinones. Nearby non-seep marine sediments were also analyzed for the purpose of comparison. Our goal was to use these biomarkers as proxies for microbial community structure and redox indicators. Total PLFA varied from core to core and were significantly less abundant in non-seep marine sediments than those near the cold seep or gas hydrates. In general, saturated straight chain, terminal branched and mid-chain branched, and monounsaturated fatty acids contributed > 98% of the total PLFA. The branched fatty acids (i.e., aC15:0, iC15:0, Me10C16:0) could be largely attributed to sulfate-reducing bacteria and the monounsaturated fatty acid (i.e., 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω7c) could be attributed to sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (Beggiatoa/Thioploca). Principal component analysis of PLFA data revealed that microbial communities were consistent with the spatial distributions of gas hydrates and Beggiatoa mats and with the variation in geochemical conditions. Isoprenoid quinone profiles indicated that aerobic respiration was the dominant metabolic process in the top-most sediment layers while the anaerobic respiration dominated the deeper intervals in the marine sediments. Significant amount of cyclopropyl fatty acids at all sites indicated the stress adaptation of the bacteria in the extreme environment. The consistency between the distribution of PLFA and respiratory quinones and the variation in geochemical conditions suggested that analyses of PLFA and quinone could help us to locate the existence of the coupled sulfide-oxidization and sulfate-reduction processes. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemgeoen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChemical Geologyen_HK
dc.subjectBiomarkeren_HK
dc.subjectGas hydrateen_HK
dc.subjectGulf of Mexicoen_HK
dc.subjectMultivariate statisticsen_HK
dc.subjectPhospholipid fatty acidsen_HK
dc.subjectRespiratory quinonesen_HK
dc.subjectTrans/cis ratioen_HK
dc.titleSpatial patterns of bacterial signature biomarkers in marine sediments of the Gulf of Mexicoen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, YL:yiliang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, YL=rp01354en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemgeo.2006.11.007en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847629700en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847629700&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume238en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage168en_HK
dc.identifier.epage179en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245497200003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, YL=27171876700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeacock, AD=7103229369en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhite, DC=35955284500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeyer, R=9734212500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, CL=35313221000en_HK

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