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Article: Measuring network reliability by considering paradoxes: Multiple network demon approach

TitleMeasuring network reliability by considering paradoxes: Multiple network demon approach
Authors
KeywordsCosts
Traffic Control
Issue Date2009
PublisherUS National Research Council, Transportation Research Board. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.trb.org/Publications/Public/PubsTRRJournalPrint.aspx
Citation
Transportation Research Record, 2009 n. 2090, p. 42-50 How to Cite?
AbstractTraditionally, game theoretic approaches to measuring transport network reliability have relied on the outcome of a game played between network users seeking to minimize their travel costs and an origin-destination-specific (O-D-specific) demon that seeks the opposite by damaging links in the network. This problem assumes the presence of only one demon in each O-D pair and assumes the capacity reduction to be 50% if the link is selected for damage by one or more O-D-specific demons. The game is typically expressed as a path-based formulation, which is computationally intensive since the formulation requires path enumeration. With relaxation of the assumptions on the O-D-specific nature of the demons and the capacity reduction, a link-based multiple network demon formulation is proposed by the nonlinear complementarity problem approach, in which each demon is free to select any link to damage. Within this framework, the effects of the proposed model on total expected network cost and reliability measures are examined, and specific examples demonstrate the paradoxical phenomenon that if one adds a road to a network, then all travelers may be worse off for total expected network cost or travel time reliability. Overall, the results indicate the importance of assumptions used to total expected network cost and reliability measures and provide some insights into the problem of ignoring these paradoxical phenomena in reliable and robust network design.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91222
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.522
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.474
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National University of Singapore
Programme for Research in Third-Level Institutions
Irish Higher Education Authority
Funding Information:

This research was jointly sponsored by a start-up grant from the National University of Singapore and the Programme for Research in Third-Level Institutions administered by the Irish Higher Education Authority.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, WYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:15:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:15:07Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTransportation Research Record, 2009 n. 2090, p. 42-50en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0361-1981en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91222-
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, game theoretic approaches to measuring transport network reliability have relied on the outcome of a game played between network users seeking to minimize their travel costs and an origin-destination-specific (O-D-specific) demon that seeks the opposite by damaging links in the network. This problem assumes the presence of only one demon in each O-D pair and assumes the capacity reduction to be 50% if the link is selected for damage by one or more O-D-specific demons. The game is typically expressed as a path-based formulation, which is computationally intensive since the formulation requires path enumeration. With relaxation of the assumptions on the O-D-specific nature of the demons and the capacity reduction, a link-based multiple network demon formulation is proposed by the nonlinear complementarity problem approach, in which each demon is free to select any link to damage. Within this framework, the effects of the proposed model on total expected network cost and reliability measures are examined, and specific examples demonstrate the paradoxical phenomenon that if one adds a road to a network, then all travelers may be worse off for total expected network cost or travel time reliability. Overall, the results indicate the importance of assumptions used to total expected network cost and reliability measures and provide some insights into the problem of ignoring these paradoxical phenomena in reliable and robust network design.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherUS National Research Council, Transportation Research Board. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.trb.org/Publications/Public/PubsTRRJournalPrint.aspxen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTransportation Research Recorden_HK
dc.subjectCostsen_HK
dc.subjectTraffic Controlen_HK
dc.titleMeasuring network reliability by considering paradoxes: Multiple network demon approachen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSzeto, WY:ceszeto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySzeto, WY=rp01377en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3141/2090-05en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-76149091846en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-76149091846&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.issue2090en_HK
dc.identifier.spage42en_HK
dc.identifier.epage50en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268737100005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSzeto, WY=7003652508en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO'Brien, L=23569876500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO'Mahony, M=7102575274en_HK

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