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Article: Global Positioning System phase fluctuations and ultraviolet images from the Polar satellite

TitleGlobal Positioning System phase fluctuations and ultraviolet images from the Polar satellite
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherAmerican Geophysical Union
Citation
Journal of Geophysical Research A: Space Physics, 2000, v. 105 A3, p. 5201-5213 How to Cite?
AbstractIn a study designed to determine the temporal development of ionospheric irregularities in the auroral region in magnetic storm periods, different types of simultaneous observations were compared for the storms of January 10, April 10-11, and May 15, 1997. The data sets consisted of ultraviolet images (UVI) from the Polar satellite, phase fluctuations and total electron content (TEC) from Global Positioning System (GPS) recordings at a large number of sites, magnetometer observations and hemispheric power precipitation. The large-scale global or macroscale picture of the magnetic storm showed the importance of universal time in the development of irregularities. The hemispheric total power picture and the global indices such as Kp show this macroscale picture of the entire storm period. However, individual sites show differences in localized magnetic field variations and the development of irregularities; this we term the microscale. The storms of January 10 and May 15 show the importance of local magnetic time and local magnetic variations at the sites, while the storm of April 10-11 was dominated by the UT storm development. During the intense activity of the storms, total electron content shows minute-by-minute increases with the satellite moving to positions 6 km apart in the minute. The structured precipitation either directly produces irregularities or indirectly sets instability conditions for irregularity development in the auroral region. Good correlation was established for the three storms between UVI intensity and phase fluctuation development. The UVI Lyman-Birge-Hopfield-long (170 nm) emission is sensitive to 100-200 km precipitation. Phase fluctuation development undoubtedly arises from perturbations in the F region as well. Topside and bottomside soundings have shown the high occurrence of spread-F in the auroral region. The comparison of the data sets from these storms and from other studies indicates that the creation of irregularities develops from conditions existing over a large range of bottomside heights, i.e., at altitudes from 100 km to the F layer. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91088
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.318
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.310
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAarons, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorMendillo, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiou, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorCodrescu, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:12:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:12:51Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research A: Space Physics, 2000, v. 105 A3, p. 5201-5213en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0148-0227en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91088-
dc.description.abstractIn a study designed to determine the temporal development of ionospheric irregularities in the auroral region in magnetic storm periods, different types of simultaneous observations were compared for the storms of January 10, April 10-11, and May 15, 1997. The data sets consisted of ultraviolet images (UVI) from the Polar satellite, phase fluctuations and total electron content (TEC) from Global Positioning System (GPS) recordings at a large number of sites, magnetometer observations and hemispheric power precipitation. The large-scale global or macroscale picture of the magnetic storm showed the importance of universal time in the development of irregularities. The hemispheric total power picture and the global indices such as Kp show this macroscale picture of the entire storm period. However, individual sites show differences in localized magnetic field variations and the development of irregularities; this we term the microscale. The storms of January 10 and May 15 show the importance of local magnetic time and local magnetic variations at the sites, while the storm of April 10-11 was dominated by the UT storm development. During the intense activity of the storms, total electron content shows minute-by-minute increases with the satellite moving to positions 6 km apart in the minute. The structured precipitation either directly produces irregularities or indirectly sets instability conditions for irregularity development in the auroral region. Good correlation was established for the three storms between UVI intensity and phase fluctuation development. The UVI Lyman-Birge-Hopfield-long (170 nm) emission is sensitive to 100-200 km precipitation. Phase fluctuation development undoubtedly arises from perturbations in the F region as well. Topside and bottomside soundings have shown the high occurrence of spread-F in the auroral region. The comparison of the data sets from these storms and from other studies indicates that the creation of irregularities develops from conditions existing over a large range of bottomside heights, i.e., at altitudes from 100 km to the F layer. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Geophysical Research A: Space Physicsen_HK
dc.titleGlobal Positioning System phase fluctuations and ultraviolet images from the Polar satelliteen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, B:blin@hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-39449101096en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-39449101096&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume105en_HK
dc.identifier.issueA3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage5201en_HK
dc.identifier.epage5213en_HK

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