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Article: Compliance with international emission regulations: Reducing the air pollution from merchant vessels

TitleCompliance with international emission regulations: Reducing the air pollution from merchant vessels
Authors
KeywordsAir Pollution
Imo
Maritime Country
Marpol Convention
Issue Date2006
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marpol
Citation
Marine Policy, 2006, v. 30 n. 3, p. 220-225 How to Cite?
AbstractIn September 1997, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted an international convention protocol to reduce air pollution from ships, in order to achieve sustainable maritime development. This protocol has been approved by 15 member countries and will be enforced in May 2005. Pollutants emitted from ships, such as nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxides, etc. will be regulated by this convention through ship inspections and issuance of certificates. Ships belonging to maritime countries such as Taiwan, which sail around the world and berth in commercial ports, must obey this convention. This study has investigated possible strategies, which may be adopted by maritime countries to conform to this IMO convention in order to reduce the air pollution from ships. A sea-going ship must prepare EIAPP and IAPP certificates for inspection by port-state-control officials, when the ship is anchored at a maritime port. These port-state-control officials may also require the continuous detection and sampling of a ship's emissions, while it is berthed at the port. Legislative support is necessary for successful implementation of these safeguards. It is suggested, therefore, that the administration of both navigational and environmental protection, in maritime countries, cooperate in the revision of relevant federal laws, to implement the provisions of the MARPOL 73/78/97 convention; in this way, the air pollution from ships can be effectively controlled. Installation of advanced detection equipment can effectively detect any ships' violations of air pollution regulations. The Harbor Affairs' Bureau should also establish a database of air pollution inspections for ships berthed within their harbor, requiring that ships' equipment comply with the requirements of the MARPOL convention, for the reduction of air pollution. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90969
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.567
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, C-Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:11:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:11:05Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Policy, 2006, v. 30 n. 3, p. 220-225en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0308-597Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90969-
dc.description.abstractIn September 1997, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted an international convention protocol to reduce air pollution from ships, in order to achieve sustainable maritime development. This protocol has been approved by 15 member countries and will be enforced in May 2005. Pollutants emitted from ships, such as nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxides, etc. will be regulated by this convention through ship inspections and issuance of certificates. Ships belonging to maritime countries such as Taiwan, which sail around the world and berth in commercial ports, must obey this convention. This study has investigated possible strategies, which may be adopted by maritime countries to conform to this IMO convention in order to reduce the air pollution from ships. A sea-going ship must prepare EIAPP and IAPP certificates for inspection by port-state-control officials, when the ship is anchored at a maritime port. These port-state-control officials may also require the continuous detection and sampling of a ship's emissions, while it is berthed at the port. Legislative support is necessary for successful implementation of these safeguards. It is suggested, therefore, that the administration of both navigational and environmental protection, in maritime countries, cooperate in the revision of relevant federal laws, to implement the provisions of the MARPOL 73/78/97 convention; in this way, the air pollution from ships can be effectively controlled. Installation of advanced detection equipment can effectively detect any ships' violations of air pollution regulations. The Harbor Affairs' Bureau should also establish a database of air pollution inspections for ships berthed within their harbor, requiring that ships' equipment comply with the requirements of the MARPOL convention, for the reduction of air pollution. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marpolen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Policyen_HK
dc.subjectAir Pollutionen_HK
dc.subjectImoen_HK
dc.subjectMaritime Countryen_HK
dc.subjectMarpol Conventionen_HK
dc.titleCompliance with international emission regulations: Reducing the air pollution from merchant vesselsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, B:blin@hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.marpol.2005.01.005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644824064en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644824064&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage220en_HK
dc.identifier.epage225en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236658500003-

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