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Article: Phototransformations of advanced glycation end products in the human eye lens due to ultraviolet a light irradiation

TitlePhototransformations of advanced glycation end products in the human eye lens due to ultraviolet a light irradiation
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2005
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0077-8923&site=1
Citation
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 2005, v. 1043, p. 166-173 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious studies from this laboratory have shown that ultraviolet A (UVA) light can bleach the yellow advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of aged and cataractous human lenses. The AGEs OP-lysine and argpyrimidine are two UVA-absorbing posttranslational modifications that are abundant in the eye lens. The purpose of this study was to outline the changes in these two AGEs due to UVA irradiation. The changes of OP-lysine, OP-phenethylamine (a phenethylamine analogue of OP-lysine), and argpyrimidine due to irradiation with UVA light in the presence or absence of air and ascorbic acid were followed by different spectral methods. Aged human lenses were similarly irradiated in artificial aqueous humor. The amounts of OP-lysine in the irradiated lenses and in the corresponding dark controls were determined by HPLC. Both OP-lysine and argpyrimidine decreased 20% when irradiated with UVA light in the absence of ascorbic acid. Under the same conditions, OP-lysine was bleached 80% in the presence of ascorbic acid during irradiation experiments. In contrast, argpyrimidine UVA light bleaching was not affected by the presence of ascorbic acid. Interestingly the major product of OP-phenethylamine after UVA irradiation in the presence of ascorbic acid was phenethylamine, which indicates that the entire heterocycle of this AGE was cleaved and the initial amino group was restored. Some AGEs in the human eye lens can be transformed by UVA light. © 2005 New York Academy of Sciences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90849
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.518
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.389
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArgirov, OKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorOrtwerth, BJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:09:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:09:18Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 2005, v. 1043, p. 166-173en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0077-8923en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90849-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies from this laboratory have shown that ultraviolet A (UVA) light can bleach the yellow advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of aged and cataractous human lenses. The AGEs OP-lysine and argpyrimidine are two UVA-absorbing posttranslational modifications that are abundant in the eye lens. The purpose of this study was to outline the changes in these two AGEs due to UVA irradiation. The changes of OP-lysine, OP-phenethylamine (a phenethylamine analogue of OP-lysine), and argpyrimidine due to irradiation with UVA light in the presence or absence of air and ascorbic acid were followed by different spectral methods. Aged human lenses were similarly irradiated in artificial aqueous humor. The amounts of OP-lysine in the irradiated lenses and in the corresponding dark controls were determined by HPLC. Both OP-lysine and argpyrimidine decreased 20% when irradiated with UVA light in the absence of ascorbic acid. Under the same conditions, OP-lysine was bleached 80% in the presence of ascorbic acid during irradiation experiments. In contrast, argpyrimidine UVA light bleaching was not affected by the presence of ascorbic acid. Interestingly the major product of OP-phenethylamine after UVA irradiation in the presence of ascorbic acid was phenethylamine, which indicates that the entire heterocycle of this AGE was cleaved and the initial amino group was restored. Some AGEs in the human eye lens can be transformed by UVA light. © 2005 New York Academy of Sciences.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0077-8923&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.titlePhototransformations of advanced glycation end products in the human eye lens due to ultraviolet a light irradiationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, B:blin@hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1196/annals.1333.021en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16037236-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1564128-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-23744471990en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-23744471990&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1043en_HK
dc.identifier.spage166en_HK
dc.identifier.epage173en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231834100021-

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