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Article: How Geobacteraceae may dominate subsurface biodegradation: Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens in slow-growth habitat-simulating retentostats

TitleHow Geobacteraceae may dominate subsurface biodegradation: Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens in slow-growth habitat-simulating retentostats
Authors
KeywordsSpecies Index: Bacteria (Microorganisms)
Geobacter
Geobacter Metallireducens
Geobacter Sp.
Geobacteraceae
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMI
Citation
Environmental Microbiology, 2009, v. 11 n. 9, p. 2425-2433 How to Cite?
AbstractGeobacteraceae dominate many iron-reducing subsurface environments and are associated with biodegradation of organic pollutants. In order to enhance the understanding of the environmental role played by Geobacteraceae, the physiology of Geobacter metallireducens was investigated at the low growth rates found in its subsurface habitat. Cultivation in retentostats (a continuous culturing device with biomass retention) under electron acceptor and electron donor limitation enabled growth rates as low as 0.0008 h-1. The maximum growth yield was between 0.05 and 0.09 C-mol biomass per C-mol acetate and comparable to that observed in batch experiments. Maintenance energy demand is among the lowest reported for heterotrophic bacteria, under both acetate and AQDS limitation. The cells were able to use alternative electron acceptors directly, without requiring de novo protein synthesis. We discuss how the extremely low maintenance energy demand and the ability to readily use alternative electron acceptors may help Geobacter species to become ubiquitous and dominant microorganisms in many iron-reducing subsurface settings. © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90839
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.932
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.002
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research (NWO)
Netherlands Center for Soil Quality Management and Knowledge Transfer (SKB)
Delft Cluster
Netherlands' BSIK Ecogenomics programme
Funding Information:

The TRIAS programme, a joint venture of the Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research (NWO), the Netherlands Center for Soil Quality Management and Knowledge Transfer (SKB) and Delft Cluster, and the Netherlands' BSIK Ecogenomics programme supported this project financially.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorWesterhoff, HVen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRöling, WFMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:09:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:09:09Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Microbiology, 2009, v. 11 n. 9, p. 2425-2433en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1462-2912en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90839-
dc.description.abstractGeobacteraceae dominate many iron-reducing subsurface environments and are associated with biodegradation of organic pollutants. In order to enhance the understanding of the environmental role played by Geobacteraceae, the physiology of Geobacter metallireducens was investigated at the low growth rates found in its subsurface habitat. Cultivation in retentostats (a continuous culturing device with biomass retention) under electron acceptor and electron donor limitation enabled growth rates as low as 0.0008 h-1. The maximum growth yield was between 0.05 and 0.09 C-mol biomass per C-mol acetate and comparable to that observed in batch experiments. Maintenance energy demand is among the lowest reported for heterotrophic bacteria, under both acetate and AQDS limitation. The cells were able to use alternative electron acceptors directly, without requiring de novo protein synthesis. We discuss how the extremely low maintenance energy demand and the ability to readily use alternative electron acceptors may help Geobacter species to become ubiquitous and dominant microorganisms in many iron-reducing subsurface settings. © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMIen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Microbiologyen_HK
dc.subjectSpecies Index: Bacteria (Microorganisms)en_HK
dc.subjectGeobacteren_HK
dc.subjectGeobacter Metallireducensen_HK
dc.subjectGeobacter Sp.en_HK
dc.subjectGeobacteraceaeen_HK
dc.titleHow Geobacteraceae may dominate subsurface biodegradation: Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens in slow-growth habitat-simulating retentostatsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, B:blin@hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.01971.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19638178-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69949110616en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69949110616&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2425en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2433en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1462-2920-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269539700022-
dc.identifier.citeulike5735920-

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