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Article: Subsurface degradation of resin-based composites

TitleSubsurface degradation of resin-based composites
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/dental
Citation
Dental Materials, 2007, v. 23 n. 8, p. 944-951 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To determine the depth of a degraded subsurface layer produced in dental composites as a result of exposure to lactic acid or NaOH, by observing the penetration of AgNO3 solution. Methods: Specimens were prepared from four resin composites; Point 4 (Kerr), Premise (Kerr), Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE), Ceram X (Dentsply), and two polyacid-modified resin composites; Dyract (Dentsply) and F2000 (3M/ESPE). The specimens were immersed in distilled water for 1 week, transferred to one of three aqueous media at 60 °C for 2 weeks; distilled water, 0.01 mol/L lactic acid or 0.1N NaOH, washed and immersed in 50% (w/w) aqueous silver nitrate for 10 days at 60 °C and placed in a photodeveloper solution. After reduction of the silver, specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned and polished, coated with carbon, and examined by backscattered mode scanning electron microscopy. The depth of silver penetration into the degraded area was measured from the SEM micrographs. Energy dispersive analysis X-ray (EDAX) was used to confirm the presence of silver. Results: NaOH produced the greatest depth of degradation and lactic acid the least. Premise showed the greatest depth of silver penetration when subjected to NaOH, and Filtek Supreme the second with peeling of the surface and cracking, whereas F2000 and Point 4 showed the least in NaOH and lactic acid. Significance: ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the depth of silver penetration was material and solution dependent, and the differences were significant for most of the materials (P < 0.05). © 2006 Academy of Dental Materials.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90751
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.931
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.339
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBagheri, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorTyas, MJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBurrow, MFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:07:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:07:45Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDental Materials, 2007, v. 23 n. 8, p. 944-951en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0109-5641en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90751-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To determine the depth of a degraded subsurface layer produced in dental composites as a result of exposure to lactic acid or NaOH, by observing the penetration of AgNO3 solution. Methods: Specimens were prepared from four resin composites; Point 4 (Kerr), Premise (Kerr), Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE), Ceram X (Dentsply), and two polyacid-modified resin composites; Dyract (Dentsply) and F2000 (3M/ESPE). The specimens were immersed in distilled water for 1 week, transferred to one of three aqueous media at 60 °C for 2 weeks; distilled water, 0.01 mol/L lactic acid or 0.1N NaOH, washed and immersed in 50% (w/w) aqueous silver nitrate for 10 days at 60 °C and placed in a photodeveloper solution. After reduction of the silver, specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned and polished, coated with carbon, and examined by backscattered mode scanning electron microscopy. The depth of silver penetration into the degraded area was measured from the SEM micrographs. Energy dispersive analysis X-ray (EDAX) was used to confirm the presence of silver. Results: NaOH produced the greatest depth of degradation and lactic acid the least. Premise showed the greatest depth of silver penetration when subjected to NaOH, and Filtek Supreme the second with peeling of the surface and cracking, whereas F2000 and Point 4 showed the least in NaOH and lactic acid. Significance: ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the depth of silver penetration was material and solution dependent, and the differences were significant for most of the materials (P < 0.05). © 2006 Academy of Dental Materials.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/dentalen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDental Materialsen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen_HK
dc.subject.meshComposite Resins - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshDrug Storageen_HK
dc.subject.meshElectron Probe Microanalysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshHydrolysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshImmersionen_HK
dc.subject.meshLactic Acid - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaterials Testingen_HK
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_HK
dc.subject.meshSilver - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshSilver Nitrateen_HK
dc.subject.meshSodium Hydroxide - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshWater - chemistryen_HK
dc.titleSubsurface degradation of resin-based compositesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBurrow, MF:mfburr58@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBurrow, MF=rp01306en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.dental.2006.06.035en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16996586-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250196404en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250196404&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage944en_HK
dc.identifier.epage951en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248251900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBagheri, R=8635819700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTyas, MJ=7006088443en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurrow, MF=7005876730en_HK

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