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Article: Surface characteristics of aesthetic restorative materials - An SEM study

TitleSurface characteristics of aesthetic restorative materials - An SEM study
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
Citation
Journal Of Oral Rehabilitation, 2007, v. 34 n. 1, p. 68-76 How to Cite?
AbstractTo determine the degree of surface roughness of glass-ionomer cements (GICs) and polyacid-modified resin composite (PAMRC) after polishing and immersion in various foodstuffs. Three tooth-coloured restorative materials were used: a PAMRC (F2000), a conventional glass-ionomer cement (CGIC) (Fuji IX) and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RM-GIC) (Fuji II LC). Disk-shaped specimens were prepared and tested with either a plastics matrix finish or after polishing with wet silicon carbide papers up to 2000-grit. All specimens were immersed in 37°C-distilled water for 1 week, followed by three different foodstuffs (red wine, coffee or tea) for a further 2 weeks. Replicas of specimens were prepared by taking polyvinyl siloxane impressions, casting in epoxy resin, gold sputter-coating and examining using a Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope. The polished and matrix finish specimens of F2000 showed many microcracks at low magnification, and eroded surfaces with missing and protruding particles at high magnification in the polished specimens. The surface-polished specimens of Fuji II LC were considerably rougher than the matrix-finish specimens, with large voids and protruding filler particles. The effects of foodstuffs on Fuji II LC and F2000 were not noticeable. The CGIC became noticeably rougher after exposure to coffee and tea. All specimens had the smoothest surface when they were cured against a plastics matrix strip, and all materials had a rougher surface after polishing. None of the foodstuffs produced a perceptible increase in roughness on RM-GIC and PAMRC surfaces, whereas coffee and tea markedly increased the surface roughness of Fuji IX. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90719
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.926
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.757
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBagheri, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorBurrow, MFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTyas, MJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:07:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Oral Rehabilitation, 2007, v. 34 n. 1, p. 68-76en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-182Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90719-
dc.description.abstractTo determine the degree of surface roughness of glass-ionomer cements (GICs) and polyacid-modified resin composite (PAMRC) after polishing and immersion in various foodstuffs. Three tooth-coloured restorative materials were used: a PAMRC (F2000), a conventional glass-ionomer cement (CGIC) (Fuji IX) and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RM-GIC) (Fuji II LC). Disk-shaped specimens were prepared and tested with either a plastics matrix finish or after polishing with wet silicon carbide papers up to 2000-grit. All specimens were immersed in 37°C-distilled water for 1 week, followed by three different foodstuffs (red wine, coffee or tea) for a further 2 weeks. Replicas of specimens were prepared by taking polyvinyl siloxane impressions, casting in epoxy resin, gold sputter-coating and examining using a Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope. The polished and matrix finish specimens of F2000 showed many microcracks at low magnification, and eroded surfaces with missing and protruding particles at high magnification in the polished specimens. The surface-polished specimens of Fuji II LC were considerably rougher than the matrix-finish specimens, with large voids and protruding filler particles. The effects of foodstuffs on Fuji II LC and F2000 were not noticeable. The CGIC became noticeably rougher after exposure to coffee and tea. All specimens had the smoothest surface when they were cured against a plastics matrix strip, and all materials had a rougher surface after polishing. None of the foodstuffs produced a perceptible increase in roughness on RM-GIC and PAMRC surfaces, whereas coffee and tea markedly increased the surface roughness of Fuji IX. © 2007 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Oral Rehabilitationen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.subject.meshCoffeeen_HK
dc.subject.meshComposite Resins - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Polishing - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Restoration Wearen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Restoration, Permanenten_HK
dc.subject.meshGlass Ionomer Cements - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_HK
dc.subject.meshResin Cements - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshTeaen_HK
dc.subject.meshWineen_HK
dc.titleSurface characteristics of aesthetic restorative materials - An SEM studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBurrow, MF:mfburr58@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBurrow, MF=rp01306en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2842.2006.01608.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17207080-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845772179en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845772179&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage68en_HK
dc.identifier.epage76en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2842-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242905000009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBagheri, R=8635819700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurrow, MF=7005876730en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTyas, MJ=7006088443en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1000886-

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