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Article: Gender, age and self-employment: Some things change, some stay the same

TitleGender, age and self-employment: Some things change, some stay the same
Authors
KeywordsAge groups
Gender
Motivation (psychology)
Self employed workers
Small enterprises
Issue Date2007
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/wimr.htm
Citation
Women In Management Review, 2007, v. 22 n. 2, p. 122-135 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose - This paper aims to investigate age and gender differences in initial motivations for starting a business. What is not known, however, is whether the initial motivations for starting the business are different for older people and whether any gender differences exist. Historically, women were "pushed" rather than "pulled" into business ownership, but more recent studies have indicated that, overall, many women now actively choose self-employment. However, age may be a new barrier for women and men. Design/methodology/approach - The study combined a self-administered questionnaire which was used to collect data relating to general information about the respondent and their business, in addition to their start-up motivations. In total 270 questionnaires were returned. About 15 in-depth interviews were also conducted to verify the empirical findings. Findings - The results showed that self-employment is a reactive rather than proactive decision for both older women and men; however, women were less inclined to actively seek self-employment as their employment option of choice. In addition, the findings also show that a significant motivation for many younger women is still because of the double domestic shift, indicating therefore that some things change but some things stay the same for women. Originality/value - Whereas the majority of previous research has looked at start-up motivation, few have considered age and gender as independent variables. Given the increasing number of "baby boomers" starting their own businesses, this research can have practical policy implications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90404
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWalker, EAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, BJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:10:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:10:05Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWomen In Management Review, 2007, v. 22 n. 2, p. 122-135en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0964-9425en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90404-
dc.description.abstractPurpose - This paper aims to investigate age and gender differences in initial motivations for starting a business. What is not known, however, is whether the initial motivations for starting the business are different for older people and whether any gender differences exist. Historically, women were "pushed" rather than "pulled" into business ownership, but more recent studies have indicated that, overall, many women now actively choose self-employment. However, age may be a new barrier for women and men. Design/methodology/approach - The study combined a self-administered questionnaire which was used to collect data relating to general information about the respondent and their business, in addition to their start-up motivations. In total 270 questionnaires were returned. About 15 in-depth interviews were also conducted to verify the empirical findings. Findings - The results showed that self-employment is a reactive rather than proactive decision for both older women and men; however, women were less inclined to actively seek self-employment as their employment option of choice. In addition, the findings also show that a significant motivation for many younger women is still because of the double domestic shift, indicating therefore that some things change but some things stay the same for women. Originality/value - Whereas the majority of previous research has looked at start-up motivation, few have considered age and gender as independent variables. Given the increasing number of "baby boomers" starting their own businesses, this research can have practical policy implications.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/wimr.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWomen in Management Reviewen_HK
dc.subjectAge groupsen_HK
dc.subjectGenderen_HK
dc.subjectMotivation (psychology)en_HK
dc.subjectSelf employed workersen_HK
dc.subjectSmall enterprisesen_HK
dc.titleGender, age and self-employment: Some things change, some stay the sameen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0964-9425&volume=22 &issue=2&spage=122&epage=135&date=2007&atitle=Gender,+age+and+self-employment:+some+things+change,+some+stay+the+sameen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWebster, BJ: bwebster@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, BJ=rp00969en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09649420710732088en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847130069en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros131560en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847130069&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage122en_HK
dc.identifier.epage135en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalker, EA=35365309600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, BJ=15066354200en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1124621-

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