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Article: Peripheral and posterior pole retinal lesions in association with high myopia: A cross-sectional community-based study in Hong Kong

TitlePeripheral and posterior pole retinal lesions in association with high myopia: A cross-sectional community-based study in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/eye
Citation
Eye, 2008, v. 22 n. 2, p. 209-213 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with posterior pole and peripheral retinal lesions in Chinese subjects with high myopia. Methods: Three hundred and thirty-seven asymptomatic adults with high myopia of refractive error ≤-6D were examined in a cross-sectional community-based study. All subjects underwent cycloplegic refraction, ultrasound biometry and dilated fundal examination. Statistical analysis was performed to assess factors associated with the presence of posterior pole and peripheral retinal lesions. Results: The mean age of the 337 subjects was 36.0 years and the mean spherical equivalent refractive error was -10.2D. Thirty-eight eyes (11.3%, 95% CI=8.1-15.2%) were found to have one or more posterior pole lesions and subjects with posterior pole lesion had significantly older age, longer axial length and higher degree of myopia (all P<0.001) compared with subjects without posterior pole lesion. After controlling for axial length, both the severity of refractive error and older age were significantly associated with the presence of posterior pole lesion (both P<0.001). For peripheral retinal lesions, 189 eyes (56.1%, 95% CI=50.6-61.5%) were found to have one or more peripheral retinal lesions. The presence of peripheral retinal lesion was associated with younger age and higher degree of refractive error (P=0.046 and 0.002, respectively). Conclusion: Posterior pole and peripheral retinal degenerative lesions were found in a considerable proportion of subjects with high myopia. As some of these retinal lesions might predispose to visual impairment, highly myopic individuals should be educated on the symptoms of various eye conditions and seek care immediately if symptoms arise.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90382
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.213
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.132
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, TYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, DSPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, WWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, DSCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:09:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:09:35Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEye, 2008, v. 22 n. 2, p. 209-213en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0950-222Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90382-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with posterior pole and peripheral retinal lesions in Chinese subjects with high myopia. Methods: Three hundred and thirty-seven asymptomatic adults with high myopia of refractive error ≤-6D were examined in a cross-sectional community-based study. All subjects underwent cycloplegic refraction, ultrasound biometry and dilated fundal examination. Statistical analysis was performed to assess factors associated with the presence of posterior pole and peripheral retinal lesions. Results: The mean age of the 337 subjects was 36.0 years and the mean spherical equivalent refractive error was -10.2D. Thirty-eight eyes (11.3%, 95% CI=8.1-15.2%) were found to have one or more posterior pole lesions and subjects with posterior pole lesion had significantly older age, longer axial length and higher degree of myopia (all P<0.001) compared with subjects without posterior pole lesion. After controlling for axial length, both the severity of refractive error and older age were significantly associated with the presence of posterior pole lesion (both P<0.001). For peripheral retinal lesions, 189 eyes (56.1%, 95% CI=50.6-61.5%) were found to have one or more peripheral retinal lesions. The presence of peripheral retinal lesion was associated with younger age and higher degree of refractive error (P=0.046 and 0.002, respectively). Conclusion: Posterior pole and peripheral retinal degenerative lesions were found in a considerable proportion of subjects with high myopia. As some of these retinal lesions might predispose to visual impairment, highly myopic individuals should be educated on the symptoms of various eye conditions and seek care immediately if symptoms arise.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/eyeen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEyeen_HK
dc.titlePeripheral and posterior pole retinal lesions in association with high myopia: A cross-sectional community-based study in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0950-222X&volume=22&spage=209&epage=213&date=2008&atitle=Peripheral+and+posterior+pole+retinal+lesions+in+association+with+high+myopia:+a+cross-sectional+community-based+study+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, WWK: wicolai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, WWK=rp00531en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.eye.6702573en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16946749-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-39449133027en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149720en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-39449133027&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage209en_HK
dc.identifier.epage213en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253141400008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, TYY=7202203581en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, DSP=7202965663en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, WWK=7402231098en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, DSC=35500200200en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike825361-

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