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Article: A prospective, split face, single-blinded study looking at the use of an infrared device with contact cooling in the treatment of skin laxity in Asians

TitleA prospective, split face, single-blinded study looking at the use of an infrared device with contact cooling in the treatment of skin laxity in Asians
Authors
KeywordsAsians
Infrared
Skin tightening
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34073
Citation
Lasers In Surgery And Medicine, 2008, v. 40 n. 2, p. 146-152 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Although monopolar radiofrequency treatment is effective in the improvement of skin laxity, the pain and cost that are associated with this method suggest the need for alternative treatment options. Recently, an infrared device with contact cooling has been shown to be effective in the treatment of skin laxity, with ultrastructural changes observed that are similar to those that are observed following treatment with a monopolar radiofrequency device. However, no control was included in previous studies. Objective: To conduct a prospective, split-face, single-blinded study to look at the efficacy and complications among Asians of treatment for skin tightening with an infrared device with contact cooling. Method: Thirteen Chinese women were treated. An infrared device with contact cooling (Titan, Cutera, Brisbane, CA) was used to treat one side of the face and the untreated side served as the control. The treatment was performed twice with a 4-week interval between the treatments and the patients were followed up by subjective assessment using a structured questionnaire 1 and 3 months after the second (and last) treatment. In all cases, pre- and post-treatment clinical photographs were taken. Two independent observers assessed the photographs. Results: Twenty-three percentage of patients reported mild improvement, 15% reported moderate improvement, and 54% reported significant improvement 3 months after their second (and last) treatment. In terms of objective assessment, 41% of patients were identified to have some degree of improvement of the treated side 3 months after their second treatment. Compared with the untreated side, the treated side improved significantly (P = 0.031) at 1 and 3 months after the second treatment. Blistering occurred in one patient, which had resolved completely by the 3-month follow-up visit. Conclusion: An infrared device with contact cooling can be used effectively and safely for the treatment of skin laxity, especially in smaller anatomical areas. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90356
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.135
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.977
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, HHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, CSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShek, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKono, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:09:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:09:15Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLasers In Surgery And Medicine, 2008, v. 40 n. 2, p. 146-152en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0196-8092en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90356-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although monopolar radiofrequency treatment is effective in the improvement of skin laxity, the pain and cost that are associated with this method suggest the need for alternative treatment options. Recently, an infrared device with contact cooling has been shown to be effective in the treatment of skin laxity, with ultrastructural changes observed that are similar to those that are observed following treatment with a monopolar radiofrequency device. However, no control was included in previous studies. Objective: To conduct a prospective, split-face, single-blinded study to look at the efficacy and complications among Asians of treatment for skin tightening with an infrared device with contact cooling. Method: Thirteen Chinese women were treated. An infrared device with contact cooling (Titan, Cutera, Brisbane, CA) was used to treat one side of the face and the untreated side served as the control. The treatment was performed twice with a 4-week interval between the treatments and the patients were followed up by subjective assessment using a structured questionnaire 1 and 3 months after the second (and last) treatment. In all cases, pre- and post-treatment clinical photographs were taken. Two independent observers assessed the photographs. Results: Twenty-three percentage of patients reported mild improvement, 15% reported moderate improvement, and 54% reported significant improvement 3 months after their second (and last) treatment. In terms of objective assessment, 41% of patients were identified to have some degree of improvement of the treated side 3 months after their second treatment. Compared with the untreated side, the treated side improved significantly (P = 0.031) at 1 and 3 months after the second treatment. Blistering occurred in one patient, which had resolved completely by the 3-month follow-up visit. Conclusion: An infrared device with contact cooling can be used effectively and safely for the treatment of skin laxity, especially in smaller anatomical areas. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34073en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLasers in Surgery and Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectAsiansen_HK
dc.subjectInfrareden_HK
dc.subjectSkin tighteningen_HK
dc.titleA prospective, split face, single-blinded study looking at the use of an infrared device with contact cooling in the treatment of skin laxity in Asiansen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, CS: carolsyu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, CS=rp00305en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lsm.20586en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18306155-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-40449142214en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros164690en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-40449142214&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage146en_HK
dc.identifier.epage152en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253670900013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, HH=24555248900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, CS=8856262400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShek, S=35995822400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, CK=7201354123en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKono, T=26643566000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK

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