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Article: Developmental dyslexia is characterized by the co-existence of visuospatial and phonological disorders in Chinese children

TitleDevelopmental dyslexia is characterized by the co-existence of visuospatial and phonological disorders in Chinese children
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherCell Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.current-biology.com/
Citation
Current Biology, 2009, v. 19 n. 19, p. R890-R892 How to Cite?
AbstractDevelopmental dyslexia is a neurological condition that is characterized by severe impairment in reading skill acquisition in people with adequate intelligence and typical schooling [1-3]. For English readers, reading impairment is critically associated with a phonological processing disorder [3-5], which may co-occur with an orthographic (visual word form) processing deficit [6], but not with a general visual processing dysfunction in most dyslexics [7]. The pathophysiology of dyslexia varies across languages [8]: for instance, unlike English, written Chinese maps visually intricate graphic forms (characters) onto meanings; pronunciation of Chinese characters must be rote memorized. This suggests that, in Chinese, a fine-grained visuospatial analysis must be performed to activate characters' phonology and meaning; consequently, disordered phonological processing may commonly co-exist with abnormal visuospatial processing in Chinese dyslexia. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an fMRI experiment in which 12 Chinese dyslexics, shown previously [9] to exhibit a phonological disorder, performed a physical size judgment measuring visuospatial dimensions. Compared with 12 control subjects, the dyslexics showed weaker activations in left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) mediating visuospatial processing. Analyses of individual dyslexics' performances further suggest that developmental dyslexia in Chinese is commonly associated with the co-existence of a visuospatial deficit and a phonological disorder. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
DescriptionCorrespondences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90338
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.983
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.729
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSiok, WTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, JAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJin, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:08:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:08:52Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Biology, 2009, v. 19 n. 19, p. R890-R892en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90338-
dc.descriptionCorrespondences-
dc.description.abstractDevelopmental dyslexia is a neurological condition that is characterized by severe impairment in reading skill acquisition in people with adequate intelligence and typical schooling [1-3]. For English readers, reading impairment is critically associated with a phonological processing disorder [3-5], which may co-occur with an orthographic (visual word form) processing deficit [6], but not with a general visual processing dysfunction in most dyslexics [7]. The pathophysiology of dyslexia varies across languages [8]: for instance, unlike English, written Chinese maps visually intricate graphic forms (characters) onto meanings; pronunciation of Chinese characters must be rote memorized. This suggests that, in Chinese, a fine-grained visuospatial analysis must be performed to activate characters' phonology and meaning; consequently, disordered phonological processing may commonly co-exist with abnormal visuospatial processing in Chinese dyslexia. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an fMRI experiment in which 12 Chinese dyslexics, shown previously [9] to exhibit a phonological disorder, performed a physical size judgment measuring visuospatial dimensions. Compared with 12 control subjects, the dyslexics showed weaker activations in left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) mediating visuospatial processing. Analyses of individual dyslexics' performances further suggest that developmental dyslexia in Chinese is commonly associated with the co-existence of a visuospatial deficit and a phonological disorder. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCell Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.current-biology.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Biologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshDyslexia - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshParietal Lobe - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshSpace Perception - physiology-
dc.subject.meshVisual Perception - physiology-
dc.titleDevelopmental dyslexia is characterized by the co-existence of visuospatial and phonological disorders in Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0960-9822&volume=19&issue=19&spage=R890&epage=R892&date=2009&atitle=Developmental+dyslexia+is+characterized+by+the+co-existence+of+visuospatial+and+phonological+disorders+in+Chinese+childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSiok, WT: siok@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSpinks, JA: spinks@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySiok, WT=rp01208en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySpinks, JA=rp00063en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cub.2009.08.014en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19825347-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349768057en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169955en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349768057&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue19en_HK
dc.identifier.spageR890en_HK
dc.identifier.epageR892en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1879-0445-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271085400009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiok, WT=6602471035en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpinks, JA=6701628658en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, Z=46961272300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5949204-

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