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Article: Romance, Insularity, and Representation: Wong Kar-wai's 'In the Mood for Love' and Hong Kong Cinema

TitleRomance, Insularity, and Representation: Wong Kar-wai's 'In the Mood for Love' and Hong Kong Cinema
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherMacquarie University, Division of Humanities. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.shimajournal.org
Citation
Shima, 2007, v. 1 n. 1, p. 88-94 How to Cite?
AbstractWong Kar-wai’s film In the Mood for Love (2000) is set in Hong Kong in the early 1960s and explores the predicament and reactions of a female character (So Lai-chen) who experiences a personal crisis at a time of political turmoil. Like that other great film about passion and solipsism, Nagisa Oshima’s Ai no corrida (1976), In the Mood for Love poses as a mere love story only to open up, in a brilliantly off-handed fashion, a scenario of political devastation against which romance becomes all but impossible. For all its casual tone, the backdrop of the 1966 riots is a shivering revelation of the social and political conditions that have made possible the protagonists’ solipsistic absorption in their feelings as well as the fragility of Hong Kong’s status as a geographical and political island. This article discusses these elements of the film in the context of contemporary Hong Kong society and cinema.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90314
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBiancorosso, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:08:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:08:34Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationShima, 2007, v. 1 n. 1, p. 88-94en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1834-6049en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90314-
dc.description.abstractWong Kar-wai’s film In the Mood for Love (2000) is set in Hong Kong in the early 1960s and explores the predicament and reactions of a female character (So Lai-chen) who experiences a personal crisis at a time of political turmoil. Like that other great film about passion and solipsism, Nagisa Oshima’s Ai no corrida (1976), In the Mood for Love poses as a mere love story only to open up, in a brilliantly off-handed fashion, a scenario of political devastation against which romance becomes all but impossible. For all its casual tone, the backdrop of the 1966 riots is a shivering revelation of the social and political conditions that have made possible the protagonists’ solipsistic absorption in their feelings as well as the fragility of Hong Kong’s status as a geographical and political island. This article discusses these elements of the film in the context of contemporary Hong Kong society and cinema.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMacquarie University, Division of Humanities. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.shimajournal.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofShimaen_HK
dc.titleRomance, Insularity, and Representation: Wong Kar-wai's 'In the Mood for Love' and Hong Kong Cinemaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1834-6049&volume=1-1&spage=88&epage=94&date=2007&atitle=Romance,+Insularity,+and+Representation:+Wong+Kar-wai%27s+%27In+the+Mood+for+Love%27+and+Hong+Kong+Cinemaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBiancorosso, G: rogopag@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBiancorosso, G=rp01213en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros129082en_HK
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.epage94-

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