File Download
  • No File Attached
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Tag questions in Hong Kong English: a corpus-based study
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleTag questions in Hong Kong English: a corpus-based study
 
AuthorsWong, MLY
 
Issue Date2007
 
CitationAsian Englishes, 2007, v. 10 n. 1, p. 44-61 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13488678.2007.10801199
 
AbstractThis corpus-based study reports on a quantitative and qualitative account of the use of tag questions in Hong Kong English. About two hundred instances of question tags were extracted from the Hong Kong component of the International Corpus of English (ICE-HK). Tag questions are more than nine times as frequent in spoken texts as in written texts. Hong Kong speakers of English tend to use disproportionately more positive-positive tag constructions (e.g., It’s pretty, is it?) than native English speakers, yielding a high error rate of tag question production. Is it? is used as a universal question tag. Results concerning pragmatic functions reveal a higher use of ‘confirmatory’ tags encouraging participation of speakers in conversation. The conclusion discusses possible pedagogical implications of the tendencies of tag questions in Hong Kong English.
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13488678.2007.10801199
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWong, MLY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:08:22Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:08:22Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractThis corpus-based study reports on a quantitative and qualitative account of the use of tag questions in Hong Kong English. About two hundred instances of question tags were extracted from the Hong Kong component of the International Corpus of English (ICE-HK). Tag questions are more than nine times as frequent in spoken texts as in written texts. Hong Kong speakers of English tend to use disproportionately more positive-positive tag constructions (e.g., It’s pretty, is it?) than native English speakers, yielding a high error rate of tag question production. Is it? is used as a universal question tag. Results concerning pragmatic functions reveal a higher use of ‘confirmatory’ tags encouraging participation of speakers in conversation. The conclusion discusses possible pedagogical implications of the tendencies of tag questions in Hong Kong English.
 
dc.identifier.citationAsian Englishes, 2007, v. 10 n. 1, p. 44-61 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13488678.2007.10801199
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13488678.2007.10801199
 
dc.identifier.epage61
 
dc.identifier.hkuros157100
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.spage44
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90298
 
dc.identifier.volume10
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Englishes
 
dc.titleTag questions in Hong Kong English: a corpus-based study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Wong, MLY</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-09-06T10:08:22Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-09-06T10:08:22Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2007</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Asian Englishes, 2007, v. 10 n. 1, p. 44-61</identifier.citation>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/90298</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>This corpus-based study reports on a quantitative and qualitative account of the use of tag questions in Hong Kong English. About two hundred instances of question tags were extracted from the Hong Kong component of the International Corpus of English (ICE-HK). Tag questions are more than nine times as frequent in spoken texts as in written texts. Hong Kong speakers of English tend to use disproportionately more positive-positive tag constructions (e.g., It&#8217;s pretty, is it?) than native English speakers, yielding a high error rate of tag question production. Is it? is used as a universal question tag. Results concerning pragmatic functions reveal a higher use of &#8216;confirmatory&#8217; tags encouraging participation of speakers in conversation. The conclusion discusses possible pedagogical implications of the tendencies of tag questions in Hong Kong English.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<relation.ispartof>Asian Englishes</relation.ispartof>
<title>Tag questions in Hong Kong English: a corpus-based study</title>
<type>Article</type>
<identifier.doi>10.1080/13488678.2007.10801199</identifier.doi>
<identifier.hkuros>157100</identifier.hkuros>
<identifier.volume>10</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>1</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>44</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>61</identifier.epage>
</item>