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Article: Colonial Hong Kong as a cultural-historical place

TitleColonial Hong Kong as a cultural-historical place
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASS
Citation
Modern Asian Studies, 2006, v. 40 n. 2, p. 517-543 How to Cite?
AbstractIn July 1997, when Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty, this former British colony became a new kind of place: a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China (PRC). In the several years leading up to the 1997 transition, a sudden outpouring of Mainland Chinese scholarship stressed how Hong Kong had been an inalienable part of China since ancient times. Until then, however, Hong Kong had rarely figured in Mainland Chinese scholarship. Indeed, Hong Kong suffered from what Michael Yahuda has called a "peculiar neglect": administered by the British but claimed by China, it was "a kind of bureaucratic no-man's land." Only one university in all of China had a research institute dedicated primarily to studying Hong Kong. As part of this new "Hong Kong studies" (Xianggangxue), in 1997 China's national television studio produced two multi-episodic documentaries on Hong Kong: "One Hundred Years of Hong Kong" (Xianggang bainian) and "Hong Kong Vicissitudes" (Xianggang cangsang). The studio also produced two shorter documentaries, "One Hundred Points about Hong Kong" (Xianggang baiti) and "The Story of Hong Kong" (Xianggang de gushi). The "Fragrant Harbor" that PRC historians had generally dismissed as an embarrassing anachronism in a predominantly postcolonial world suddenly found its way into millions of Mainland Chinese homes. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90276
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.405
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.332
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, JMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:08:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:08:05Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationModern Asian Studies, 2006, v. 40 n. 2, p. 517-543en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0026-749Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90276-
dc.description.abstractIn July 1997, when Hong Kong reverted to Chinese sovereignty, this former British colony became a new kind of place: a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China (PRC). In the several years leading up to the 1997 transition, a sudden outpouring of Mainland Chinese scholarship stressed how Hong Kong had been an inalienable part of China since ancient times. Until then, however, Hong Kong had rarely figured in Mainland Chinese scholarship. Indeed, Hong Kong suffered from what Michael Yahuda has called a "peculiar neglect": administered by the British but claimed by China, it was "a kind of bureaucratic no-man's land." Only one university in all of China had a research institute dedicated primarily to studying Hong Kong. As part of this new "Hong Kong studies" (Xianggangxue), in 1997 China's national television studio produced two multi-episodic documentaries on Hong Kong: "One Hundred Years of Hong Kong" (Xianggang bainian) and "Hong Kong Vicissitudes" (Xianggang cangsang). The studio also produced two shorter documentaries, "One Hundred Points about Hong Kong" (Xianggang baiti) and "The Story of Hong Kong" (Xianggang de gushi). The "Fragrant Harbor" that PRC historians had generally dismissed as an embarrassing anachronism in a predominantly postcolonial world suddenly found its way into millions of Mainland Chinese homes. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofModern Asian Studiesen_HK
dc.rightsModern Asian Studies. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.titleColonial Hong Kong as a cultural-historical placeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0026-749X&volume=402&spage=517&epage=43&date=2006&atitle=Colonial+Hong+Kong+as+a+Cultural-Historical+Place%27en_HK
dc.identifier.emailCarroll, JM: jcarroll@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCarroll, JM=rp01188en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0026749X06001958en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645888677en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros138695en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645888677&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage517en_HK
dc.identifier.epage543en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237600600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarroll, JM=55429577200en_HK

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