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Article: Antiquity, Modernity, and Social Theory

TitleAntiquity, Modernity, and Social Theory
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherBrill Academic Publishers.
Citation
Journal of East Asian Archaeology, 2000, v. 2 n. 1-2, p. 363-381 How to Cite?
AbstractWang Mang's Mingtang is one of the most firmly-dated and well-documented pieces of evidence concerning ancient Chinese cosmology. The present article uses this important archaeological discovery as a touchstone for an analysis of the current scholarly reconstruction of China's antiquity and the search for continuity in Chinese culture. Here one may remark a shift in responses to the problems of modernity and national identity. Chinese intellectuals today face the challenge of breaking out of the deadly cycle of stark opposition between the conservatives' egocentric insistence on cultural superiority and the Westerners' self-denying cultural nihilism. The means for creating a more nuanced discourse lies in the integration of Chinese history into the global social sciences - not by 'applying' Western theories to Chinese material, but by revising and advancing current theories in the light of data and principles generated from Chinese history.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90234
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:07:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:07:25Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of East Asian Archaeology, 2000, v. 2 n. 1-2, p. 363-381en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1387-6813en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90234-
dc.description.abstractWang Mang's Mingtang is one of the most firmly-dated and well-documented pieces of evidence concerning ancient Chinese cosmology. The present article uses this important archaeological discovery as a touchstone for an analysis of the current scholarly reconstruction of China's antiquity and the search for continuity in Chinese culture. Here one may remark a shift in responses to the problems of modernity and national identity. Chinese intellectuals today face the challenge of breaking out of the deadly cycle of stark opposition between the conservatives' egocentric insistence on cultural superiority and the Westerners' self-denying cultural nihilism. The means for creating a more nuanced discourse lies in the integration of Chinese history into the global social sciences - not by 'applying' Western theories to Chinese material, but by revising and advancing current theories in the light of data and principles generated from Chinese history.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBrill Academic Publishers.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of East Asian Archaeologyen_HK
dc.titleAntiquity, Modernity, and Social Theoryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, A: awang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, A=rp01155en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros57922en_HK
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.issue1-2-
dc.identifier.spage363-
dc.identifier.epage381-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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